The Responses of Young People to Their Experiences of First-Episode Psychosis: Harnessing Resilience

Tony Henderson, A. Cock

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York. There is a burgeoning literature on first-episode psychosis, the focus of which is early intervention. Little emphasis has been placed on the responses of young people to their experiences of psychosis. This study, therefore, aimed to describe and explain the responses of young people to their first episode of psychosis. Data obtained from ten young people who attended a community early intervention recovery program in Perth Western Australia were analysed using a grounded theory method. The results revealed that the basic psychosocial problem experienced by participants was loss of control resulting in disrupted lives and that the core variable, harnessing resilience, accounted for most of the variance in their behaviour to overcome this problem. The resultant framework described and explained how participants resiled and established direction in their lives. Although there are limitations with this qualitative study, such as the small size and the demographics of the sample, the findings have potential implications for approaches to service provision and phase specific interventions.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)322-328
    JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
    Volume51
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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    psychosis
    Psychotic Disorders
    resilience
    Western Australia
    experience
    grounded theory
    Sample Size
    new media
    Demography
    science
    community

    Cite this

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    abstract = "{\circledC} 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York. There is a burgeoning literature on first-episode psychosis, the focus of which is early intervention. Little emphasis has been placed on the responses of young people to their experiences of psychosis. This study, therefore, aimed to describe and explain the responses of young people to their first episode of psychosis. Data obtained from ten young people who attended a community early intervention recovery program in Perth Western Australia were analysed using a grounded theory method. The results revealed that the basic psychosocial problem experienced by participants was loss of control resulting in disrupted lives and that the core variable, harnessing resilience, accounted for most of the variance in their behaviour to overcome this problem. The resultant framework described and explained how participants resiled and established direction in their lives. Although there are limitations with this qualitative study, such as the small size and the demographics of the sample, the findings have potential implications for approaches to service provision and phase specific interventions.",
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    The Responses of Young People to Their Experiences of First-Episode Psychosis: Harnessing Resilience. / Henderson, Tony; Cock, A.

    In: Community Mental Health Journal, Vol. 51, No. 3, 2015, p. 322-328.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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