The response of plant community diversity and nutrient-acquisition strategies to long-term ecosystem development in nutrient-impoverished landscapes

Graham Anthony Zemunik

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    640 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This thesis presents four studies investigating the link between the development of soils and plant communities. The first three studies used f loristic and soil data from a long-term dune chronosequence near Jurien Bay, Australia, and the final included comparative data from sandy soil sites in the Brazilian campos rupestres. First, the fundamental role of soil pH was demonstrated, then the role of long-term soil development in shaping plant communities and nutrient-acquisition strategies was highlighte, and, finally, convergent ecosystem assembly was revealed in the campos rupestres. These studies reveal key roles of long-term soil development in shaping natural plant communities.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    Award date20 Jun 2016
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2016

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