The relationship between tectonism and composition of granitoid magmas, Yarlarweelor Gneiss Complex, Western Australia

S. Sheppard, S. A. Occhipinti, I. M. Tyler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The northwestern edge of the Archaean Yilgarn Craton in Western Australia was intensely deformed and metamorphosed during the Palaeoproterozoic Capricorn Orogeny (D1n and D2n) to form the Yarlarweelor Gneiss Complex. High-grade metamorphism and crustal thickening in the complex at ca. 1812 Ma during D1n was accompanied by voluminous veins and sheets of I-type granite and pegmatite. Most of these rocks are leucocratic, and are characterised by low Rb, FeOT + MgO, Y, Zr, Th, U and total rare earth elements (ΣREE), and high SiO2, Ba, K/Rb and Ba/Rb, and chemically resemble leucosomes from stromatic migmatites (metatexites). The granite and pegmatite formed during compression and represent low to moderate degree melts of late Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic granitic rocks. At ca. 1800 Ma, dextral strike-slip faulting during D2n followed exhumation of the Yarlarweelor Gneiss Complex, and was accompanied by intrusion of dykes and steeply dipping sheets of I-type granites. These granites have high K2O/Na2O ratios, high Rb, Zr, ΣLREE, Y, Th and U contents, and low K/Rb ratios similar to high-K granite melts and diatexite migmatites derived by large-scale biotite dehydration melting of igneous rocks. The source of the syn-D2n granites was Palaeoproterozoic meta-igneous rocks. The change in granite chemistry between ca. 1812 and ca. 1800 Ma reflects a change in the nature of melting and melt extraction, which were in turn controlled by the style of deformation. Crown

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-154
Number of pages22
JournalLithos
Volume66
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2003
Externally publishedYes

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