The relationship between naturalistic sleep variation and error monitoring in young adults: An event-related potential (ERP) study

Simone N. Fueggle, Romola S. Bucks, Allison M. Fox

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Sleep deprivation studies have highlighted the importance of adequate sleep for optimal daytime functioning. However, there is limited research exploring whether variations in natural sleep patterns produce similar difficulties to those seen in sleep deprivation studies. The aim of the current study was to explore whether naturalistic reductions in sleep duration and/or sleep quality were associated with behavioural and electrophysiological measures of cognitive control. Sixty undergraduate students were asked to wear an actigraph for 7 consecutive nights before completing a hybrid Flanker-Go/NoGo task whilst continuous EEG data were recorded. Participants were assigned to high or low sleep quality and short or long sleep duration groups using the National Sleep Foundation guidelines. Results indicated that individuals who, on average, slept <7 h each night showed inefficiencies in error-monitoring, as reflected by a reduction in amplitude of the error-related negativity (ERN) in comparison to those with longer sleep duration. These findings suggest that natural variations in sleep quantity are associated with atypical error detection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-158
JournalInternational Journal of Psychophysiology
Volume134
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2018

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Evoked Potentials
Young Adult
Sleep
Sleep Deprivation
Electroencephalography
Guidelines
Students
Research

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abstract = "Sleep deprivation studies have highlighted the importance of adequate sleep for optimal daytime functioning. However, there is limited research exploring whether variations in natural sleep patterns produce similar difficulties to those seen in sleep deprivation studies. The aim of the current study was to explore whether naturalistic reductions in sleep duration and/or sleep quality were associated with behavioural and electrophysiological measures of cognitive control. Sixty undergraduate students were asked to wear an actigraph for 7 consecutive nights before completing a hybrid Flanker-Go/NoGo task whilst continuous EEG data were recorded. Participants were assigned to high or low sleep quality and short or long sleep duration groups using the National Sleep Foundation guidelines. Results indicated that individuals who, on average, slept <7 h each night showed inefficiencies in error-monitoring, as reflected by a reduction in amplitude of the error-related negativity (ERN) in comparison to those with longer sleep duration. These findings suggest that natural variations in sleep quantity are associated with atypical error detection.",
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