The relationship between long-term blood pressure variability and cortical thickness in older adults

D. S. Gutteridge, A. Segal, J. J. McNeil, L. Beilin, A. Brodtmann, E. K. Chowdhury, G. F. Egan, M. E. Ernst, S. M. Hussain, C. M. Reid, C. E. Robb, J. Ryan, R. L. Woods, H. A. Keage, S. Jamadar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High blood pressure variability (BPV) is a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia, but its association with cortical thickness is not well understood. Here we use a topographical approach, to assess links between long-term BPV and cortical thickness in 478 (54% men at baseline) community dwelling older adults (70–88 years) from the ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly NEURO sub-study. BPV was measured as average real variability, based on annual visits across three years. Higher diastolic BPV was significantly associated with reduced cortical thickness in multiple areas, including temporal (banks of the superior temporal sulcus), parietal (supramarginal gyrus, post-central gyrus), and posterior frontal areas (pre-central gyrus, caudal middle frontal gyrus), while controlling for mean BP. Higher diastolic BPV was associated with faster progression of cortical thinning across the three years. Diastolic BPV is an important predictor of cortical thickness, and trajectory of cortical thickness, independent of mean blood pressure. This finding suggests an important biological link in the relationship between BPV and cognitive decline in older age.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-167
Number of pages11
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume129
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2023

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