The relationship between health and mating success in humans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Health has been claimed to play an important role in human sexual selection, especially in terms of mate choice. Our preferences for attractive individuals are said to represent evolved adaptations for finding high-quality, healthy mates. If this is true, then we expect health to predict mating success in humans. We tested this hypothesis using several important physiological indicators of health, including immune function, oxidative stress and semen quality, and self-reported measures of sexual behaviour that contribute to mating success. In contrast to our hypothesis, we did not find a relationship between the physiological measures of health and sexual behaviour. Our results provide little support for claims that health, at least the health measures we used, increases mating success in relatively healthy humans.

Original languageEnglish
Article number160603
Number of pages11
JournalRoyal Society Open Science
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Jan 2017

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Health
Sexual Behavior
Semen Analysis
Oxidative Stress

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abstract = "Health has been claimed to play an important role in human sexual selection, especially in terms of mate choice. Our preferences for attractive individuals are said to represent evolved adaptations for finding high-quality, healthy mates. If this is true, then we expect health to predict mating success in humans. We tested this hypothesis using several important physiological indicators of health, including immune function, oxidative stress and semen quality, and self-reported measures of sexual behaviour that contribute to mating success. In contrast to our hypothesis, we did not find a relationship between the physiological measures of health and sexual behaviour. Our results provide little support for claims that health, at least the health measures we used, increases mating success in relatively healthy humans.",
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The relationship between health and mating success in humans. / Foo, Yong Zhi; Simmons, Leigh W.; Rhodes, Gillian.

In: Royal Society Open Science, Vol. 4, No. 1, 160603, 25.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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