The relations between values and prosocial behavior among children: The moderating role of age

Maya Benish-Weisman, Ella Daniel, Joanne Sneddon, Julie Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Do children's values relate to their prosocial behavior? To answer this question, this study investigated N = 586 Australian children aged 6–12; the children reported their values and their prosocial behavior was assessed by peer nominations. As hypothesized, prosocial behavior was negatively correlated with self-enhancement values and positively correlated with self-transcendence and conservation values. In addition, age moderated the relations between values and prosocial behavior. For younger children, negative relations were found between openness-to-change values and prosocial behavior, but for older children, the relations were significantly positive. A mirror image appeared for the interaction of age and conservation values. The results have implications for values development among children and for moral development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-247
Number of pages7
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume141
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Apr 2019

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Child Behavior
Moral Development
Child Development

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abstract = "Do children's values relate to their prosocial behavior? To answer this question, this study investigated N = 586 Australian children aged 6–12; the children reported their values and their prosocial behavior was assessed by peer nominations. As hypothesized, prosocial behavior was negatively correlated with self-enhancement values and positively correlated with self-transcendence and conservation values. In addition, age moderated the relations between values and prosocial behavior. For younger children, negative relations were found between openness-to-change values and prosocial behavior, but for older children, the relations were significantly positive. A mirror image appeared for the interaction of age and conservation values. The results have implications for values development among children and for moral development.",
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The relations between values and prosocial behavior among children : The moderating role of age. / Benish-Weisman, Maya; Daniel, Ella; Sneddon, Joanne; Lee, Julie.

In: Personality and Individual Differences, Vol. 141, 15.04.2019, p. 241-247.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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