‘The productive side of disappearance’: Re-imagining detective work as a psychological and cultural mode for reckoning with traumatic pasts

Andrew Yallop

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

This thesis proposes that detective fiction is a highly adaptable genre, capable of driving narratives that frame political, historical and personal experiences of violence while complicating classical versions of the genre that understand crime as individual deviancy or a mystery to be resolved by logical inference. By closely analysing Paul Auster’s The New York Trilogy, Roberto Bolaño’s Distant Star, W.G Sebald’s Austerlitz and Patrick Modiano’s Dora Bruder, I explore the capacity of the detective form to broach ontological and existential questions stemming from traumatic pasts – particularly how the past continues to define narratives of personal and cultural identity.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Curthoys, Ned, Supervisor
  • Dolin, Kieran, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date26 Oct 2022
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2022

Embargo information

  • Embargoed from 31/10/2022 to 23/06/2023. Made publicly available on 23/06/2023.

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