The price of citizenship? Māori, Fijian and Tongan soldiers under New Zealand command in the Second World War

Adam Rankin

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

Abstract

This thesis analyses New Zealand's employment of Maori, Fijian and Tongan soldiers during the Second World War. Indigenous leaders mobilised their peoples but argued that wartime service should translate into greater political, social and economic rights. Maori were enlisted under the same conditions of service as Europeans but confronted the legacy of social and educational inequalities. In Fiji and, to a lesser extent, Tonga, the conditions of service replicated pre-war racial and financial divisions and maintained European control over leadership positions. The disparities narrowed during the war, but military service did not translate into full political, economic and social equality.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Martens, Jeremy, Supervisor
  • Edele, Mark, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date21 Oct 2020
Publication statusUnpublished - 2020

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