The potential for voluntary instruments to achieve conservation planning goals: The case of conservancies in South Africa

Linda Downsborough, Charlie M. Shackleton, Andrew T. Knight

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spatial prioritizations and gap analyses are increasingly undertaken to allocate conservation resources. Most spatial prioritizations are conducted without specifying the conservation instruments to be implemented and gap analyses typically assess formally protected areas but increasingly include private land conservation instruments. We examine conservancies to see if these voluntary instruments contribute towards achieving goals of South African conservation planning initiatives. We conducted a nationwide survey and interviews with conservancy members in Gauteng and the Eastern Cape. Conservancies have potential for assisting South Africa to achieve conservation planning goals at national and local scales but their inclusion in spatial prioritizations and gap analyses predicates improved protection for nature, operational refinement and increased support. We sound a warning to conservation planning initiatives that incorporate voluntary instruments on private land, and present recommendations for strengthening such instruments to make them more effective. Our findings may assist conservation planners elsewhere to design more effective conservation planning initiatives focused on private land.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)357-364
Number of pages8
JournalOryx
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes

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