The Phytoremediation Potential of Native Plants on New Zealand Dairy Farms

Jason L. Hahner, Brett H. Robinson, Hong-Tao Zhong , Nicholas M. Dickinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ecological restoration of marginal land and riparian zones in agricultural landscapes in New Zealand enhances the provision of above-ground ecosystem services. We investigated whether native endemic plant assemblages have remediation potential, through modifying soil nutrient and trace element mobility. Analysis of native plant foliage in situ indicated that selective uptake of a range of commonly deficient trace elements including Zn, B, Cu, Mn and Co could provide a browse crop to avoid deficiencies of these elements in livestock, although some native plants may enhance the risk of Mo and Cd toxicity. Native plant rhizospheres were found to modify soil physico-chemistry and are likely to influence lateral and vertical fluxes of chemical elements in drainage waters. Native plants on marginal land in agricultural landscapes could add value to dairy production systems whilst helping to resolve topical environmental issues.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)719-734
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Phytoremediation
Volume16
Issue number7-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Aug 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event9th International-Phytotechnology-Society Conference - Diepenbeek, Belgium
Duration: 11 Sep 201214 Sep 2012

Cite this

Hahner, Jason L. ; Robinson, Brett H. ; Zhong , Hong-Tao ; Dickinson, Nicholas M. / The Phytoremediation Potential of Native Plants on New Zealand Dairy Farms. In: International Journal of Phytoremediation. 2014 ; Vol. 16, No. 7-8. pp. 719-734.
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The Phytoremediation Potential of Native Plants on New Zealand Dairy Farms. / Hahner, Jason L.; Robinson, Brett H.; Zhong , Hong-Tao; Dickinson, Nicholas M.

In: International Journal of Phytoremediation, Vol. 16, No. 7-8, 03.08.2014, p. 719-734.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Zhong , Hong-Tao

AU - Dickinson, Nicholas M.

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AB - Ecological restoration of marginal land and riparian zones in agricultural landscapes in New Zealand enhances the provision of above-ground ecosystem services. We investigated whether native endemic plant assemblages have remediation potential, through modifying soil nutrient and trace element mobility. Analysis of native plant foliage in situ indicated that selective uptake of a range of commonly deficient trace elements including Zn, B, Cu, Mn and Co could provide a browse crop to avoid deficiencies of these elements in livestock, although some native plants may enhance the risk of Mo and Cd toxicity. Native plant rhizospheres were found to modify soil physico-chemistry and are likely to influence lateral and vertical fluxes of chemical elements in drainage waters. Native plants on marginal land in agricultural landscapes could add value to dairy production systems whilst helping to resolve topical environmental issues.

KW - trace elements

KW - endemic plants

KW - phytoremediation

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KW - NITROGEN LEACHING LOSSES

KW - NITRATE REMOVAL

KW - SOIL PROPERTIES

KW - WATER-QUALITY

KW - PASTURE

KW - MANAGEMENT

KW - WINTER

KW - LAND

KW - DICYANDIAMIDE

KW - CATCHMENT

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