The outcome of sexual conflict depends on the social environment.

Sam Lymbery

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Sexual conflict over reproduction is widespread, and can lead to the evolution of traits in males that enhance their reproductive success but harm the females they mate with. I addressed the broad question of whether the social environment, and in particular relatedness among competing males, is important for the outcome of sexual conflict. I found that male seed beetles plastically adjusted their harmfulness in response to changes in both competitor relatedness and chemical cues to kinship. The conditions that allow non-plastic divergences in harmfulness, however, are more restrictive. The social environment is therefore important for male harmfulness and female fitness.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Thesis sponsors
Award date23 Jul 2019
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2019

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