The neuregulin-3 intracellular domain is biologically active: molecular and functional characterisation of protein interactions

Jim Tiao

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

43 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

[Truncated abstract] Neuregulins (NRG’s) are pleiotropic growth factors that participate in a wide range of biological processes. The family of membrane-bound growth factors bind to and activate ErbB receptors on adjacent target cells, mediating multiple biological processes. NRG-1, NRG-2 and NRG-3 are all highly expressed in the nervous system, where it has been shown that NRG-1 is important for neuronal development, migration, synapse formation and glial cell proliferation. Little is known, however, on the specific roles of NRG-2 and NRG-3, although it is apparent that despite similar expression patterns and overlapping receptor specificity, NRG-2 and NRG-3 do not compensate for the loss of NRG-1 and mediate their own distinct activities. … Subcellular localisation experiments showed that this domain is important for trafficking of the fulllength protein to various intracellular compartments in an activity dependent manner. In addition, the ICD is required to elicit a cell death response in cultured cells and provoke an elevated α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) response in organotypic neuronal cultures following transient expression of NRG-3. A yeast two-hybrid screen identified 14-3-3ζ and PICK1 as two proteins that interacte with the human NRG-3 ICD. These interactions were confirmed both in vitro and in vivo, and were further characterised at a molecular level. This study demonstrates the ability of NRG-3 to mediate signal transduction through a biologically active ICD; a conclusion supported by identifying cytoplasmic proteins that interact with the ICD. These observations point to an additional layer of complexity where bi-directional signalling contributes to the full repertoire of NRG-3 functions.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Publication statusUnpublished - 2005

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The neuregulin-3 intracellular domain is biologically active: molecular and functional characterisation of protein interactions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this