The mycorrhizal association: just one of many nutrient acquiring specializations in natural ecosystems

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    Abstract

    This paper examines the general biology of mycorrhizal associations alongside the wide range of alternative trophic adaptations which higher plants may employ when competing for limited resources of specific nutrients within an ecosystem. All examples described come from highly nutrient-impoverished heathlands or open woodlands of the kwongan of southwest Australia. An account is given of the general patterns of rooting morphology and their association with various mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal nutrient-acquiring strategies, including various forms of parasitism, epiparasitism, autotrophy with or without mycorrhizal association. Taxonomic affinities of each grouping are examined alongside growth and life form characteristics.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-10
    JournalPlant and Soil: An International Journal on Plant-Soil Relationships
    Volume159
    Publication statusPublished - 1994

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