The mother-daughter knot : ambivalence, whiteness, trauma and relational politics in the fiction of Jean Rhys, Jamaica Kincaid and Toni Morrison

Victoria Burrows

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    511 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    [Truncated] A deliberate use of a trope or figure of thought which involves turns or conversions in thinking helps disrupt and (re)form the logic of dichotomies. This thesis works on the premise that metaphorical logic offers an alternative methodology to ways of thinking about the representation of the trauma of racism in fiction. It is a feminist work that aims to challenge the invisible normativity of whiteness that still dominates the field of literary criticism. The conceptual metaphor is the knot which suggests the interwoven network of relational politics and primarily corresponds to a figural representation of the mother-daughter connection, one of the most ambivalent of all woman-to-woman relationships. This configuration aims to suggest both the dense complexity and circuitry of the mother­daughter dyad, which comprises separate subjectivities that are loosely tied together, bodily and psychically, interwoven and entangled with one another, joined but separate, the same and other, ambivalently fused by a sense of difference and commonality.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    DOIs
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2002

    Take-down notice

    This thesis has been made available in the UWA Profiles and Research Repository as part of a UWA Library project to digitise and make available theses completed before 2003. If you are the author of this thesis and would like it removed from the UWA Profiles and Research Repository, please contact digitaltheses-lib@uwa.edu.au

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The mother-daughter knot : ambivalence, whiteness, trauma and relational politics in the fiction of Jean Rhys, Jamaica Kincaid and Toni Morrison'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this