The Modelling of Multiphase Deep Sea Oil and Gas Blowouts with Computational Fluid Dynamics

Craig Booth

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

18 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The droplet size distributions (DSDs) generated by the breakup of jets in industrial systems and accidental releases govern the movement and fate of the dispersed fluid. Turbulence-based models offer a method of DSD prediction that is more physically realistic than models based on bulk flow parameters. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models have been used to estimate turbulence quantities for use in empirical models of stirred cells and round turbulent free jets (with and without upstream blockages). It has been found that the turbulence generated by disturbances upstream of the jet exit significantly influence the jets and their resulting DSD.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Leggoe, Jeremy, Supervisor
  • Aman, Zach, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date23 Apr 2021
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2020

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