The lived experience of non English speaking background overseas qualified nurses working in Western Australian metropolitan hospital workforce: a transcendental phenomenological study

Christine Denise Andree Smith

Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

Abstract

The purpose of this research study was to explore the lived experiences of 13 female Non English Speaking Background (NESB) Overseas Qualified Nurses (OQNs) as they integrate into the Western Australian (WA) metropolitan hospital workplace. The current shortage of nurses worldwide has taken its toll on the Australian health care system. In fact nurses are at present at the top of the ten occupations in most demand. As a result there is an increased and ongoing migration of OQNs, some of them coming from non English speaking countries. Studies of migrant nurses working abroad have been conducted in countries such as the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States of America each of which have a long history in employing OQNs. Similar studies have also been carried out in the eastern states of Australia. However while NESB migrant nurses are employed in the WA health care setting and are still encouraged to come and work here, there is very little research on their employment experiences in WA. This study was a first step in addressing this gap in knowledge. A qualitative design based on Husserlian transcendental phenomenology was used to explore the lived experience of working in the WA metropolitan hospital system of 13 female NESB OQNs from five different WA metropolitan hospitals. Four main themes emerged from the data analysis; "the initial feelings of professional loss", "feelings of otherness", "rediscovering nursing" and "it all works out in the end". The findings from this research highlighted the personal and professional journey of the participants as they integrated into the WA workforce. A feature of the outcomes of this study was the participants' resilience and agency in terms of their willingness and determination not only to adapt and to learn from the new country and work practice, but also to maintain their integrity as unique professional individuals practising nursing.
LanguageEnglish
QualificationMasters
StateUnpublished - 2010

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Urban Hospitals
Nurses
Emotions
Nursing
Research
Delivery of Health Care
Occupations
Workplace
Canada
History
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Cite this

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title = "The lived experience of non English speaking background overseas qualified nurses working in Western Australian metropolitan hospital workforce: a transcendental phenomenological study",
abstract = "The purpose of this research study was to explore the lived experiences of 13 female Non English Speaking Background (NESB) Overseas Qualified Nurses (OQNs) as they integrate into the Western Australian (WA) metropolitan hospital workplace. The current shortage of nurses worldwide has taken its toll on the Australian health care system. In fact nurses are at present at the top of the ten occupations in most demand. As a result there is an increased and ongoing migration of OQNs, some of them coming from non English speaking countries. Studies of migrant nurses working abroad have been conducted in countries such as the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States of America each of which have a long history in employing OQNs. Similar studies have also been carried out in the eastern states of Australia. However while NESB migrant nurses are employed in the WA health care setting and are still encouraged to come and work here, there is very little research on their employment experiences in WA. This study was a first step in addressing this gap in knowledge. A qualitative design based on Husserlian transcendental phenomenology was used to explore the lived experience of working in the WA metropolitan hospital system of 13 female NESB OQNs from five different WA metropolitan hospitals. Four main themes emerged from the data analysis; {"}the initial feelings of professional loss{"}, {"}feelings of otherness{"}, {"}rediscovering nursing{"} and {"}it all works out in the end{"}. The findings from this research highlighted the personal and professional journey of the participants as they integrated into the WA workforce. A feature of the outcomes of this study was the participants' resilience and agency in terms of their willingness and determination not only to adapt and to learn from the new country and work practice, but also to maintain their integrity as unique professional individuals practising nursing.",
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N2 - The purpose of this research study was to explore the lived experiences of 13 female Non English Speaking Background (NESB) Overseas Qualified Nurses (OQNs) as they integrate into the Western Australian (WA) metropolitan hospital workplace. The current shortage of nurses worldwide has taken its toll on the Australian health care system. In fact nurses are at present at the top of the ten occupations in most demand. As a result there is an increased and ongoing migration of OQNs, some of them coming from non English speaking countries. Studies of migrant nurses working abroad have been conducted in countries such as the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States of America each of which have a long history in employing OQNs. Similar studies have also been carried out in the eastern states of Australia. However while NESB migrant nurses are employed in the WA health care setting and are still encouraged to come and work here, there is very little research on their employment experiences in WA. This study was a first step in addressing this gap in knowledge. A qualitative design based on Husserlian transcendental phenomenology was used to explore the lived experience of working in the WA metropolitan hospital system of 13 female NESB OQNs from five different WA metropolitan hospitals. Four main themes emerged from the data analysis; "the initial feelings of professional loss", "feelings of otherness", "rediscovering nursing" and "it all works out in the end". The findings from this research highlighted the personal and professional journey of the participants as they integrated into the WA workforce. A feature of the outcomes of this study was the participants' resilience and agency in terms of their willingness and determination not only to adapt and to learn from the new country and work practice, but also to maintain their integrity as unique professional individuals practising nursing.

AB - The purpose of this research study was to explore the lived experiences of 13 female Non English Speaking Background (NESB) Overseas Qualified Nurses (OQNs) as they integrate into the Western Australian (WA) metropolitan hospital workplace. The current shortage of nurses worldwide has taken its toll on the Australian health care system. In fact nurses are at present at the top of the ten occupations in most demand. As a result there is an increased and ongoing migration of OQNs, some of them coming from non English speaking countries. Studies of migrant nurses working abroad have been conducted in countries such as the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States of America each of which have a long history in employing OQNs. Similar studies have also been carried out in the eastern states of Australia. However while NESB migrant nurses are employed in the WA health care setting and are still encouraged to come and work here, there is very little research on their employment experiences in WA. This study was a first step in addressing this gap in knowledge. A qualitative design based on Husserlian transcendental phenomenology was used to explore the lived experience of working in the WA metropolitan hospital system of 13 female NESB OQNs from five different WA metropolitan hospitals. Four main themes emerged from the data analysis; "the initial feelings of professional loss", "feelings of otherness", "rediscovering nursing" and "it all works out in the end". The findings from this research highlighted the personal and professional journey of the participants as they integrated into the WA workforce. A feature of the outcomes of this study was the participants' resilience and agency in terms of their willingness and determination not only to adapt and to learn from the new country and work practice, but also to maintain their integrity as unique professional individuals practising nursing.

KW - Nurses, Foreign

KW - Western Australia

KW - Hospitals

KW - Employees

KW - Women foreign workers

M3 - Master's Thesis

ER -