The knowing visual self

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Like all information-processing systems, biological visual systems are limited by internal and external noise; but this noise never actually impinges on our conscious perception. An article recently published in the Journal of Vision suggests that, at least for orientation judgments, the visual system has access to its own noisiness and sets thresholds accordingly. This could well be a general principle in perception, with important and wide ranging consequences.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)363-364
JournalTrends in Cognitive Sciences
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Noise
Automatic Data Processing
Information Systems

Cite this

@article{d8af5f7b1989438ea33e0131e5140405,
title = "The knowing visual self",
abstract = "Like all information-processing systems, biological visual systems are limited by internal and external noise; but this noise never actually impinges on our conscious perception. An article recently published in the Journal of Vision suggests that, at least for orientation judgments, the visual system has access to its own noisiness and sets thresholds accordingly. This could well be a general principle in perception, with important and wide ranging consequences.",
author = "John Ross and David Burr",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1016/j.tics.2008.06.007",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "363--364",
journal = "Trends in Cognitive Sciences",
issn = "1364-6613",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "10",

}

The knowing visual self. / Ross, John; Burr, David.

In: Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Vol. 12, No. 10, 2008, p. 363-364.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - The knowing visual self

AU - Ross, John

AU - Burr, David

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Like all information-processing systems, biological visual systems are limited by internal and external noise; but this noise never actually impinges on our conscious perception. An article recently published in the Journal of Vision suggests that, at least for orientation judgments, the visual system has access to its own noisiness and sets thresholds accordingly. This could well be a general principle in perception, with important and wide ranging consequences.

AB - Like all information-processing systems, biological visual systems are limited by internal and external noise; but this noise never actually impinges on our conscious perception. An article recently published in the Journal of Vision suggests that, at least for orientation judgments, the visual system has access to its own noisiness and sets thresholds accordingly. This could well be a general principle in perception, with important and wide ranging consequences.

U2 - 10.1016/j.tics.2008.06.007

DO - 10.1016/j.tics.2008.06.007

M3 - Review article

VL - 12

SP - 363

EP - 364

JO - Trends in Cognitive Sciences

JF - Trends in Cognitive Sciences

SN - 1364-6613

IS - 10

ER -