The Intestinal Microbiota in Acute Anorexia Nervosa and during Renourishment: Relationship to Depression, Anxiety, and Eating Disorder Psychopathology

S.C. Kleiman, Hunna Watson, E.C. Bulik-Sullivan, E.Y. Huh, L.M. Tarantino, C.M. Bulik, I.M. Carroll

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    Abstract

    © 2015 by the American Psychosomatic Society. Objective The relevance of the microbe-gut-brain axis to psychopathology is of interest in anorexia nervosa (AN), as the intestinal microbiota plays a critical role in metabolic function and weight regulation. Methods We characterized the composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota in AN, using stool samples collected at inpatient admission (T1; n = 16) and discharge (T2; n = 10). At T1, participants completed the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories and the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire. Patients with AN were compared with healthy individuals who participated in a previous study (healthy comparison group; HCG). Genomic DNA was isolated from stool samples, and bacterial composition was characterized by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Sequencing results were processed by the Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology pipeline. We compared T1 versus T2 samples, samples from both points were compared with HCG (n = 12), and associations between psychopathology and T1 samples were explored. Results In patients with AN, significant changes emerged between T1 and T2 in taxa abundance and beta (between-sample) diversity. Patients with AN had significantly lower alpha (within-sample) diversity than did HCG at both T1 (p =.0001) and T2 (p =.016), and differences in taxa abundance were found between AN patients and HCG. Levels of depression, anxiety, and eating disorder psychopathology at T1 were associated with composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota. Conclusions We provide evidence of an intestinal dysbiosis in AN and an association between mood and the enteric microbiota in this patient population. Future directions include mechanistic investigations of the microbe-gut-brain axis in animal models and association of microbial measures with metabolic changes and recovery indices.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)969-981
    JournalPsychosomatic Medicine
    Volume77
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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    Anorexia Nervosa
    Anxiety Disorders
    Psychopathology
    Depression
    Dysbiosis
    Microbiota
    Brain
    Gastrointestinal Microbiome
    Feeding and Eating Disorders
    Ecology
    rRNA Genes
    Inpatients
    Anxiety
    Animal Models
    Weights and Measures
    Equipment and Supplies
    DNA
    Population

    Cite this

    Kleiman, S.C. ; Watson, Hunna ; Bulik-Sullivan, E.C. ; Huh, E.Y. ; Tarantino, L.M. ; Bulik, C.M. ; Carroll, I.M. / The Intestinal Microbiota in Acute Anorexia Nervosa and during Renourishment: Relationship to Depression, Anxiety, and Eating Disorder Psychopathology. In: Psychosomatic Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 77, No. 9. pp. 969-981.
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    title = "The Intestinal Microbiota in Acute Anorexia Nervosa and during Renourishment: Relationship to Depression, Anxiety, and Eating Disorder Psychopathology",
    abstract = "{\circledC} 2015 by the American Psychosomatic Society. Objective The relevance of the microbe-gut-brain axis to psychopathology is of interest in anorexia nervosa (AN), as the intestinal microbiota plays a critical role in metabolic function and weight regulation. Methods We characterized the composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota in AN, using stool samples collected at inpatient admission (T1; n = 16) and discharge (T2; n = 10). At T1, participants completed the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories and the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire. Patients with AN were compared with healthy individuals who participated in a previous study (healthy comparison group; HCG). Genomic DNA was isolated from stool samples, and bacterial composition was characterized by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Sequencing results were processed by the Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology pipeline. We compared T1 versus T2 samples, samples from both points were compared with HCG (n = 12), and associations between psychopathology and T1 samples were explored. Results In patients with AN, significant changes emerged between T1 and T2 in taxa abundance and beta (between-sample) diversity. Patients with AN had significantly lower alpha (within-sample) diversity than did HCG at both T1 (p =.0001) and T2 (p =.016), and differences in taxa abundance were found between AN patients and HCG. Levels of depression, anxiety, and eating disorder psychopathology at T1 were associated with composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota. Conclusions We provide evidence of an intestinal dysbiosis in AN and an association between mood and the enteric microbiota in this patient population. Future directions include mechanistic investigations of the microbe-gut-brain axis in animal models and association of microbial measures with metabolic changes and recovery indices.",
    author = "S.C. Kleiman and Hunna Watson and E.C. Bulik-Sullivan and E.Y. Huh and L.M. Tarantino and C.M. Bulik and I.M. Carroll",
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    The Intestinal Microbiota in Acute Anorexia Nervosa and during Renourishment: Relationship to Depression, Anxiety, and Eating Disorder Psychopathology. / Kleiman, S.C.; Watson, Hunna; Bulik-Sullivan, E.C.; Huh, E.Y.; Tarantino, L.M.; Bulik, C.M.; Carroll, I.M.

    In: Psychosomatic Medicine, Vol. 77, No. 9, 2015, p. 969-981.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Kleiman, S.C.

    AU - Watson, Hunna

    AU - Bulik-Sullivan, E.C.

    AU - Huh, E.Y.

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    AU - Carroll, I.M.

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    N2 - © 2015 by the American Psychosomatic Society. Objective The relevance of the microbe-gut-brain axis to psychopathology is of interest in anorexia nervosa (AN), as the intestinal microbiota plays a critical role in metabolic function and weight regulation. Methods We characterized the composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota in AN, using stool samples collected at inpatient admission (T1; n = 16) and discharge (T2; n = 10). At T1, participants completed the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories and the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire. Patients with AN were compared with healthy individuals who participated in a previous study (healthy comparison group; HCG). Genomic DNA was isolated from stool samples, and bacterial composition was characterized by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Sequencing results were processed by the Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology pipeline. We compared T1 versus T2 samples, samples from both points were compared with HCG (n = 12), and associations between psychopathology and T1 samples were explored. Results In patients with AN, significant changes emerged between T1 and T2 in taxa abundance and beta (between-sample) diversity. Patients with AN had significantly lower alpha (within-sample) diversity than did HCG at both T1 (p =.0001) and T2 (p =.016), and differences in taxa abundance were found between AN patients and HCG. Levels of depression, anxiety, and eating disorder psychopathology at T1 were associated with composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota. Conclusions We provide evidence of an intestinal dysbiosis in AN and an association between mood and the enteric microbiota in this patient population. Future directions include mechanistic investigations of the microbe-gut-brain axis in animal models and association of microbial measures with metabolic changes and recovery indices.

    AB - © 2015 by the American Psychosomatic Society. Objective The relevance of the microbe-gut-brain axis to psychopathology is of interest in anorexia nervosa (AN), as the intestinal microbiota plays a critical role in metabolic function and weight regulation. Methods We characterized the composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota in AN, using stool samples collected at inpatient admission (T1; n = 16) and discharge (T2; n = 10). At T1, participants completed the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories and the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire. Patients with AN were compared with healthy individuals who participated in a previous study (healthy comparison group; HCG). Genomic DNA was isolated from stool samples, and bacterial composition was characterized by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Sequencing results were processed by the Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology pipeline. We compared T1 versus T2 samples, samples from both points were compared with HCG (n = 12), and associations between psychopathology and T1 samples were explored. Results In patients with AN, significant changes emerged between T1 and T2 in taxa abundance and beta (between-sample) diversity. Patients with AN had significantly lower alpha (within-sample) diversity than did HCG at both T1 (p =.0001) and T2 (p =.016), and differences in taxa abundance were found between AN patients and HCG. Levels of depression, anxiety, and eating disorder psychopathology at T1 were associated with composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota. Conclusions We provide evidence of an intestinal dysbiosis in AN and an association between mood and the enteric microbiota in this patient population. Future directions include mechanistic investigations of the microbe-gut-brain axis in animal models and association of microbial measures with metabolic changes and recovery indices.

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