The Influence Of Social Hierarchies On Non-Spatial Attention In Typically Developed Adults And Adults With Autistic-Like Traits

Ashton Roberts

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Social status, a ubiquitous construct across species and cultures, is attained through Dominance (intimidation and physicality) or Prestige (skill and respect) pathways. Despite its ubiquity, little is known about how status influences competition for attentional resources, or how individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) attend to status cues. Across five experimental chapters, this thesis investigates the relationship between social status and non-spatial attention, demonstrating the novel finding that individuals low in dominance have a competitive advantage for attention, while competition is unaffected by variations in prestige or autistic-like traits. This work significantly expands our understanding of how status biases attention.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Thesis sponsors
Award date17 Jun 2020
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2020

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