The influence of evening electronic device use on sleep and performance in athletes

Maddison Jones

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

This thesis demonstrates that evening electronic device use may not impair sleep quality or reduce sleep duration in athletes, despite 30% of athletes reporting excessive sleepiness. Using an electronic device for 2 h prior to bedtime did not have any negative consequences on sleep quality or quantity in netball players. Additionally, avoiding electronic devices overnight during training camps did not improve sleep quantity or cognitive performance in triathletes or water polo players. Furthermore, shorter versions (3- and 5-min) of the Psychomotor Vigilance Test did not provide similar measures of cognitive performance compared with the 10-min test in basketball players.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Peeling, Peter, Supervisor
  • Dawson, Brian, Supervisor
  • Eastwood, Peter, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date25 Jun 2018
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2018

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Athletes
Sleep
Equipment and Supplies
Basketball
Water

Cite this

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The influence of evening electronic device use on sleep and performance in athletes. / Jones, Maddison.

2018.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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