The Infinite Plasticity of the Digital : posthuman Possibilities, Embodiment and Technology in William Gibsons's Interstitial Trilogy

Tama Leaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Ever since William Gibson coined the term "cyberspace" in his debut novel Neuromancer, his work has been seen by many as a yardstick for postmodern and, more recently, posthuman possibilities. This article critically examines Gibson's second trilogy (Virtual Light, Idoru and All Tomorrow's Parties), focusing on the way digital technologies and identity intersect and interact, with particular emphasis on the role of embodiment. Using the work of Donna Haraway, Judith Butler and N. Katherine Hayles, it is argued that while William Gibson's second trilogy is infused with posthuman possibilities, the role of embodiment is not relegated to one choice among many. Rather the specific materiality of individual existence is presented as both desirable and ultimately necessary to a complete existence, even in a posthuman present or future.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
JournalReconstruction: studies in contemporary culture
Volume4
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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