The Indirect Effect of Biased Judgment Processing of Bodies on Eating Disorder Symptomatology Through Eating Disorder-Specific Reflection

Rebecca Shao, Isabel Krug, Laura Dondzilo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
28 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: The current study sought to empirically evaluate the relationships between biases involving judgment of bodies in terms of their shape and weight, ED-specific rumination subtypes (i.e., ED-specific reflection and ED-specific brooding) and eating disorder (ED) symptomatology. Methods: Female undergraduates (n = 344) aged 17–24 years completed self-report measures of ED-specific rumination and ED symptomatology and a novel task designed to assess biased judgement processing of bodies. Results: Results revealed that a bias in judging bodies in terms of their shape and weight was indirectly but not directly associated with ED symptomatology. Specifically, biased judgement processing was indirectly associated with ED symptomatology via ED-specific ruminative reflection but not via ED-specific ruminative brooding. Conclusions: The current findings suggest biased judgement processing of bodies may contribute to ED symptomatology via ED-specific ruminative reflection. It is important to note that the indirect effect was small suggesting the involvement of other potential variables in this relationship. Thus, further exploration of the cognitive factors involved in the relationship between biased judgement processing and ED symptomatology is warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)477-487
Number of pages11
JournalCognitive Therapy and Research
Volume48
Issue number3
Early online date14 Oct 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2024

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