The importance of self-efficacy as a mediating variable between learning environments and achievement

Graham Douglas, Keith Punch, J. Hattie, B. Moriarty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to investigate the extent to which self-efficacy acts as a mediating variable between the learning environment and achievement. Seven year 5 classes (N=179 students aged 9 to 10 years) were allocated randomly to cooperative, competitive or individualistic environments for twice-weekly social studies lessons, changing environments after five weeks. Data collected on self-efficacy and achievement in weeks 5 and 10 indicated that co-operative environments led to higher self-efficacy and achievement as well as more appropriate behaviour. The performance of particular tasks under competition appears to be enhanced when students have previously worked co-operatively, but may be difficult to sustain as self-efficacy and behaviour standards decline.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-84
JournalBritish Journal of Educational Psychology
Volume65
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995

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