The importance of institutional image to student satisfaction and loyalty within higher education

R. Brown, Tim Mazzarol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

184 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper outlines the findings of a study employing a partial least squares (PLS) structural equation methodology to test a customer satisfaction model of the drivers of student satisfaction and loyalty in higher education settings. Drawing upon a moderately large sample of students enrolled in four ‘types’ of Australian universities, the findings suggest that student loyalty is predicted by student satisfaction, which is in turn predicted by the perceived image of the host university. While the perceived quality of “humanware” (e.g., people and process) and “hardware” (e.g., infrastructure and tangible service elements) has an impact on perceived value, this was found to be weak and indeterminate. Of most importance was the impact of the institution’s institutional image, which strongly predicted perceived value, and to a lesser extent student satisfaction. The findings have implications for newer, less prestigious universities seeking to compete in a more deregulated, market driven environment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-95
JournalHigher Education
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

loyalty
education
student
university
hardware
Values
customer
driver
infrastructure
methodology
market

Cite this

@article{df3450e6268040838eebea380ca1ef91,
title = "The importance of institutional image to student satisfaction and loyalty within higher education",
abstract = "This paper outlines the findings of a study employing a partial least squares (PLS) structural equation methodology to test a customer satisfaction model of the drivers of student satisfaction and loyalty in higher education settings. Drawing upon a moderately large sample of students enrolled in four ‘types’ of Australian universities, the findings suggest that student loyalty is predicted by student satisfaction, which is in turn predicted by the perceived image of the host university. While the perceived quality of “humanware” (e.g., people and process) and “hardware” (e.g., infrastructure and tangible service elements) has an impact on perceived value, this was found to be weak and indeterminate. Of most importance was the impact of the institution’s institutional image, which strongly predicted perceived value, and to a lesser extent student satisfaction. The findings have implications for newer, less prestigious universities seeking to compete in a more deregulated, market driven environment.",
author = "R. Brown and Tim Mazzarol",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1007/s10734-008-9183-8",
language = "English",
volume = "58",
pages = "81--95",
journal = "Higher Education",
issn = "0018-1560",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "1",

}

The importance of institutional image to student satisfaction and loyalty within higher education. / Brown, R.; Mazzarol, Tim.

In: Higher Education, Vol. 58, No. 1, 2009, p. 81-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The importance of institutional image to student satisfaction and loyalty within higher education

AU - Brown, R.

AU - Mazzarol, Tim

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - This paper outlines the findings of a study employing a partial least squares (PLS) structural equation methodology to test a customer satisfaction model of the drivers of student satisfaction and loyalty in higher education settings. Drawing upon a moderately large sample of students enrolled in four ‘types’ of Australian universities, the findings suggest that student loyalty is predicted by student satisfaction, which is in turn predicted by the perceived image of the host university. While the perceived quality of “humanware” (e.g., people and process) and “hardware” (e.g., infrastructure and tangible service elements) has an impact on perceived value, this was found to be weak and indeterminate. Of most importance was the impact of the institution’s institutional image, which strongly predicted perceived value, and to a lesser extent student satisfaction. The findings have implications for newer, less prestigious universities seeking to compete in a more deregulated, market driven environment.

AB - This paper outlines the findings of a study employing a partial least squares (PLS) structural equation methodology to test a customer satisfaction model of the drivers of student satisfaction and loyalty in higher education settings. Drawing upon a moderately large sample of students enrolled in four ‘types’ of Australian universities, the findings suggest that student loyalty is predicted by student satisfaction, which is in turn predicted by the perceived image of the host university. While the perceived quality of “humanware” (e.g., people and process) and “hardware” (e.g., infrastructure and tangible service elements) has an impact on perceived value, this was found to be weak and indeterminate. Of most importance was the impact of the institution’s institutional image, which strongly predicted perceived value, and to a lesser extent student satisfaction. The findings have implications for newer, less prestigious universities seeking to compete in a more deregulated, market driven environment.

U2 - 10.1007/s10734-008-9183-8

DO - 10.1007/s10734-008-9183-8

M3 - Article

VL - 58

SP - 81

EP - 95

JO - Higher Education

JF - Higher Education

SN - 0018-1560

IS - 1

ER -