The Gifford Creek Ferrocarbonatite Complex, Gascoyne Province, Western Australia: Associated fenitic alteration and a putative link with the ~1075Ma Warakurna LIP

Franco Pirajno, Ignacio González-Álvarez, W. Chen, K.T. Kyser, A. Simonetti, E.M.S. Leduc, M. Legras

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Gifford Creek Ferrocarbonatite Complex (GFC), located in the Neoarchean-Palaeoproterozoic Gascoyne Province, Western Australia, comprises sills, dykes, and veins of ferrocarbonatite intruding the Pimbyana Granite and Yangibana Granite of the Durlacher Supersuite and metasedimentary rocks of the Pooranoo Metamorphics. The ferrocarbonatites are associated with complex and irregularly distributed zones of fenitic alteration. These ferrocarbonatites and fenites are also associated with a swarm of ironstone veins, containing magnetite, hematite and goethite. The GFC and associated fenite outcrops are distributed within a ~700km2 area, north of the Lyons River Fault. Ferrocarbonatite sills and dykes are predominant in a northwest-trending belt, along the southern margin of the complex; whereas ferrocarbonatite veins tend to be distributed in a series of sub-parallel west-northwest-trending linear belts, generally associated with the Fe oxide veins with sinuous trends. These veins have margins of Fe-rich carbonates associated with zones of alteration that have a fenitic character. The fenitic haloes are characterised by the presence of Na-K-feldspars and/or Na-amphiboles and magnetite. In some cases monomineralic feldspar zones (orthoclasite) are present. Fenitic alteration is spatially associated with the carbonatites, but it can also form discrete veins and veinlets in basement granitic rocks (Pimbyana and Yangibana Granites). Petrographic, XRD and SEM analyses show that the ferrocarbonatites are dominantly composed of ankerite-dolomite, magnetite, arfvedsonite-riebeckite, and lesser calcite. Alkali amphibole has compositions ranging from potassian magnesio-arfvedsonite to magnesio-riebeckite. Sills and dykes north of the Lyons River, are characterised by a carbonate-rich matrix, containing >50vol.% ankerite-dolomite, with accessory quantities of apatite, barite, monazite, and phlogopite. In-situ U-Pb age determination of apatite grains by LA-ICP-MS on a sample of ferrocarbonatite was performed and an average age of 1075±35Ma was obtained. This age is within the range of ages (~1078-1070Ma) of the Warakurna Large Igneous Province (WLIP) and we suggest that the GFC is related to the mantle plume event that generated the WLIP. This is a significant outcome, because it may lead to the recognition or discovery of other carbonatites within the area covered by the WLIP. In addition, monazite from fenitic rocks associated with the ironstones yielded an age of 1050±25Ma, suggesting that a second phase of carbonatite magmatism occurred, resulting in the emplacement of the carbonatite-ironstone veins swarm. A model is proposed to explain the formation of the GFC system. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-119
JournalLithos
Volume202-203
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2014

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Ferrosoferric Oxide
Amphibole Asbestos
ironstone
large igneous province
Apatites
Carbonates
Rocks
sill
riebeckite
magnetite
ankerite
carbonatite
monazite
Rivers
Barium Sulfate
amphibole
apatite
dolomite
fenite
granite

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@article{0203aa0b670c434d8c5bc9f55eefa232,
title = "The Gifford Creek Ferrocarbonatite Complex, Gascoyne Province, Western Australia: Associated fenitic alteration and a putative link with the ~1075Ma Warakurna LIP",
abstract = "The Gifford Creek Ferrocarbonatite Complex (GFC), located in the Neoarchean-Palaeoproterozoic Gascoyne Province, Western Australia, comprises sills, dykes, and veins of ferrocarbonatite intruding the Pimbyana Granite and Yangibana Granite of the Durlacher Supersuite and metasedimentary rocks of the Pooranoo Metamorphics. The ferrocarbonatites are associated with complex and irregularly distributed zones of fenitic alteration. These ferrocarbonatites and fenites are also associated with a swarm of ironstone veins, containing magnetite, hematite and goethite. The GFC and associated fenite outcrops are distributed within a ~700km2 area, north of the Lyons River Fault. Ferrocarbonatite sills and dykes are predominant in a northwest-trending belt, along the southern margin of the complex; whereas ferrocarbonatite veins tend to be distributed in a series of sub-parallel west-northwest-trending linear belts, generally associated with the Fe oxide veins with sinuous trends. These veins have margins of Fe-rich carbonates associated with zones of alteration that have a fenitic character. The fenitic haloes are characterised by the presence of Na-K-feldspars and/or Na-amphiboles and magnetite. In some cases monomineralic feldspar zones (orthoclasite) are present. Fenitic alteration is spatially associated with the carbonatites, but it can also form discrete veins and veinlets in basement granitic rocks (Pimbyana and Yangibana Granites). Petrographic, XRD and SEM analyses show that the ferrocarbonatites are dominantly composed of ankerite-dolomite, magnetite, arfvedsonite-riebeckite, and lesser calcite. Alkali amphibole has compositions ranging from potassian magnesio-arfvedsonite to magnesio-riebeckite. Sills and dykes north of the Lyons River, are characterised by a carbonate-rich matrix, containing >50vol.{\%} ankerite-dolomite, with accessory quantities of apatite, barite, monazite, and phlogopite. In-situ U-Pb age determination of apatite grains by LA-ICP-MS on a sample of ferrocarbonatite was performed and an average age of 1075±35Ma was obtained. This age is within the range of ages (~1078-1070Ma) of the Warakurna Large Igneous Province (WLIP) and we suggest that the GFC is related to the mantle plume event that generated the WLIP. This is a significant outcome, because it may lead to the recognition or discovery of other carbonatites within the area covered by the WLIP. In addition, monazite from fenitic rocks associated with the ironstones yielded an age of 1050±25Ma, suggesting that a second phase of carbonatite magmatism occurred, resulting in the emplacement of the carbonatite-ironstone veins swarm. A model is proposed to explain the formation of the GFC system. {\circledC} 2014 Elsevier B.V.",
author = "Franco Pirajno and Ignacio Gonz{\'a}lez-{\'A}lvarez and W. Chen and K.T. Kyser and A. Simonetti and E.M.S. Leduc and M. Legras",
year = "2014",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1016/j.lithos.2014.05.012",
language = "English",
volume = "202-203",
pages = "100--119",
journal = "Lithos",
issn = "0024-4937",
publisher = "Pergamon",

}

The Gifford Creek Ferrocarbonatite Complex, Gascoyne Province, Western Australia: Associated fenitic alteration and a putative link with the ~1075Ma Warakurna LIP. / Pirajno, Franco; González-Álvarez, Ignacio; Chen, W.; Kyser, K.T.; Simonetti, A.; Leduc, E.M.S.; Legras, M.

In: Lithos, Vol. 202-203, 08.2014, p. 100-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Gifford Creek Ferrocarbonatite Complex, Gascoyne Province, Western Australia: Associated fenitic alteration and a putative link with the ~1075Ma Warakurna LIP

AU - Pirajno, Franco

AU - González-Álvarez, Ignacio

AU - Chen, W.

AU - Kyser, K.T.

AU - Simonetti, A.

AU - Leduc, E.M.S.

AU - Legras, M.

PY - 2014/8

Y1 - 2014/8

N2 - The Gifford Creek Ferrocarbonatite Complex (GFC), located in the Neoarchean-Palaeoproterozoic Gascoyne Province, Western Australia, comprises sills, dykes, and veins of ferrocarbonatite intruding the Pimbyana Granite and Yangibana Granite of the Durlacher Supersuite and metasedimentary rocks of the Pooranoo Metamorphics. The ferrocarbonatites are associated with complex and irregularly distributed zones of fenitic alteration. These ferrocarbonatites and fenites are also associated with a swarm of ironstone veins, containing magnetite, hematite and goethite. The GFC and associated fenite outcrops are distributed within a ~700km2 area, north of the Lyons River Fault. Ferrocarbonatite sills and dykes are predominant in a northwest-trending belt, along the southern margin of the complex; whereas ferrocarbonatite veins tend to be distributed in a series of sub-parallel west-northwest-trending linear belts, generally associated with the Fe oxide veins with sinuous trends. These veins have margins of Fe-rich carbonates associated with zones of alteration that have a fenitic character. The fenitic haloes are characterised by the presence of Na-K-feldspars and/or Na-amphiboles and magnetite. In some cases monomineralic feldspar zones (orthoclasite) are present. Fenitic alteration is spatially associated with the carbonatites, but it can also form discrete veins and veinlets in basement granitic rocks (Pimbyana and Yangibana Granites). Petrographic, XRD and SEM analyses show that the ferrocarbonatites are dominantly composed of ankerite-dolomite, magnetite, arfvedsonite-riebeckite, and lesser calcite. Alkali amphibole has compositions ranging from potassian magnesio-arfvedsonite to magnesio-riebeckite. Sills and dykes north of the Lyons River, are characterised by a carbonate-rich matrix, containing >50vol.% ankerite-dolomite, with accessory quantities of apatite, barite, monazite, and phlogopite. In-situ U-Pb age determination of apatite grains by LA-ICP-MS on a sample of ferrocarbonatite was performed and an average age of 1075±35Ma was obtained. This age is within the range of ages (~1078-1070Ma) of the Warakurna Large Igneous Province (WLIP) and we suggest that the GFC is related to the mantle plume event that generated the WLIP. This is a significant outcome, because it may lead to the recognition or discovery of other carbonatites within the area covered by the WLIP. In addition, monazite from fenitic rocks associated with the ironstones yielded an age of 1050±25Ma, suggesting that a second phase of carbonatite magmatism occurred, resulting in the emplacement of the carbonatite-ironstone veins swarm. A model is proposed to explain the formation of the GFC system. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

AB - The Gifford Creek Ferrocarbonatite Complex (GFC), located in the Neoarchean-Palaeoproterozoic Gascoyne Province, Western Australia, comprises sills, dykes, and veins of ferrocarbonatite intruding the Pimbyana Granite and Yangibana Granite of the Durlacher Supersuite and metasedimentary rocks of the Pooranoo Metamorphics. The ferrocarbonatites are associated with complex and irregularly distributed zones of fenitic alteration. These ferrocarbonatites and fenites are also associated with a swarm of ironstone veins, containing magnetite, hematite and goethite. The GFC and associated fenite outcrops are distributed within a ~700km2 area, north of the Lyons River Fault. Ferrocarbonatite sills and dykes are predominant in a northwest-trending belt, along the southern margin of the complex; whereas ferrocarbonatite veins tend to be distributed in a series of sub-parallel west-northwest-trending linear belts, generally associated with the Fe oxide veins with sinuous trends. These veins have margins of Fe-rich carbonates associated with zones of alteration that have a fenitic character. The fenitic haloes are characterised by the presence of Na-K-feldspars and/or Na-amphiboles and magnetite. In some cases monomineralic feldspar zones (orthoclasite) are present. Fenitic alteration is spatially associated with the carbonatites, but it can also form discrete veins and veinlets in basement granitic rocks (Pimbyana and Yangibana Granites). Petrographic, XRD and SEM analyses show that the ferrocarbonatites are dominantly composed of ankerite-dolomite, magnetite, arfvedsonite-riebeckite, and lesser calcite. Alkali amphibole has compositions ranging from potassian magnesio-arfvedsonite to magnesio-riebeckite. Sills and dykes north of the Lyons River, are characterised by a carbonate-rich matrix, containing >50vol.% ankerite-dolomite, with accessory quantities of apatite, barite, monazite, and phlogopite. In-situ U-Pb age determination of apatite grains by LA-ICP-MS on a sample of ferrocarbonatite was performed and an average age of 1075±35Ma was obtained. This age is within the range of ages (~1078-1070Ma) of the Warakurna Large Igneous Province (WLIP) and we suggest that the GFC is related to the mantle plume event that generated the WLIP. This is a significant outcome, because it may lead to the recognition or discovery of other carbonatites within the area covered by the WLIP. In addition, monazite from fenitic rocks associated with the ironstones yielded an age of 1050±25Ma, suggesting that a second phase of carbonatite magmatism occurred, resulting in the emplacement of the carbonatite-ironstone veins swarm. A model is proposed to explain the formation of the GFC system. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

U2 - 10.1016/j.lithos.2014.05.012

DO - 10.1016/j.lithos.2014.05.012

M3 - Article

VL - 202-203

SP - 100

EP - 119

JO - Lithos

JF - Lithos

SN - 0024-4937

ER -