The effects of warm-up on intermittent sprint performance in a hot and humid environment

P. Yaicharoen, Karen Wallman, Alan Morton, David Bishop, Bob Grove

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is unknown whether a passive warm-up or an active warm-up performed at an intensity based on lactate thresholds could improve prolonged intermittent-sprint performance either in thermoneutral or hot environmental conditions. To investigate this issue, 11 male athletes performed three trials that consisted of 80 min of intermittent-sprinting performed on a cycle ergometer, preceded by either an active or a passive warm-up. Active warm-up and intermittent-sprint performance were performed in both hot and thermoneutral environmental conditions, while passive warm-up and intermittent-sprint performance were performed in hot conditions only. First sprint performance was also assessed. Results showed no significant interaction effects between any of the trials for total work (J · kg -1), work decrement, and power decrement (P = 0.10, P = 0.42, P = 0.10, respectively). While there were no significant differences between trials for work done for first sprint performance (P = 0.22), peak power was significantly higher after passive warm-up compared with active warm-up performed in either thermoneutral (P = 0.03) or in hot conditions (P = 0.02). Results suggest that the main benefits of warm-up for first sprint performance are derived from temperature-related effects. Active warm-up did not impair prolonged intermittent-sprint performance in the heat compared with thermoneutral conditions. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)967-974
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume30
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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