The effects of varying dietary fat, fish and fish oils, on blood lipids in a randomized controlled trial in men at risk of heart disease

Trevor Mori, R. Vandongen, Lawrence Beilin, Valerie Burke, J. Morris, J. Ritchie

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73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to determine the effects of incorporating fish with 40%- or 30%-fat diets and the differences in response to fish or fish oil omega 3 Men with high-normal blood pressure and elevated serum cholesterol were randomly allocated to one of seven diets for 12 wk. Fish or fish oil with a 40%-fat diet increased total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, HDL(2) cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol, and reduced triglycerides. The 30%-fat diet alone reduced cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol, with triglycerides unchanged. Fish with the 30%-fat diet reduced cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides and increased HDL(2) cholesterol. This study has shown that plasma lipids are affected similarly by fish or fish oil in men consuming a 40%-fat diet. Adverse effects of omega 3 on total and LDL cholesterol are reversed by a 30%-fat diet, whereas one daily fish meal substantially lowers triglycerides and reverses the fall in HDL cholesterol that is usual with a low-fat diet.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1060-1068
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume59
Publication statusPublished - 1994

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