The effects of sediments on marine sponges

Brian William Strehlow

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Coastal development, such as dredging, is increasing sediment loads to many marine ecosystems. The effects of increased
sediment loads on sponges were poorly known, so I used a multidisciplinary approach to assess the impact of sediments on
the survival, growth, physiology, ultrastructure and gene expression of three, abundant and broadly distributed lndo-Pacific sponge species. The most sensitive species was Carteriospongia foliascens. In comparison, Cliona orientalis exhibited limited mortality and was resilient. Finally, Ianthella basta was tolerant to sediment-related stress. Species-specific responses to stress, potential bioindicators, and stress tolerance mechanisms were identified and characterised for use by researchers, regulators and managers.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Kendrick, Gary, Supervisor
  • Clode, Peta, Supervisor
  • Renton, Michael, Supervisor
  • Webster, Nicole S., Supervisor, External person
  • Duckworth, Alan, Supervisor, External person
Award date14 Dec 2017
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2017

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Porifera
sediments
stress tolerance
stress response
ultrastructure
managers
physiology
researchers
gene expression

Cite this

Strehlow, Brian William. / The effects of sediments on marine sponges. 2017.
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title = "The effects of sediments on marine sponges",
abstract = "Coastal development, such as dredging, is increasing sediment loads to many marine ecosystems. The effects of increasedsediment loads on sponges were poorly known, so I used a multidisciplinary approach to assess the impact of sediments onthe survival, growth, physiology, ultrastructure and gene expression of three, abundant and broadly distributed lndo-Pacific sponge species. The most sensitive species was Carteriospongia foliascens. In comparison, Cliona orientalis exhibited limited mortality and was resilient. Finally, Ianthella basta was tolerant to sediment-related stress. Species-specific responses to stress, potential bioindicators, and stress tolerance mechanisms were identified and characterised for use by researchers, regulators and managers.",
keywords = "Sponge, Dredging, Elevated suspended sediment concentrations, Light attenuation, Sedimentation, Pumping, 3D X-Ray Microscopy, Differential gene expression",
author = "Strehlow, {Brian William}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.4225/23/5a5c0141cb4de",
language = "English",
school = "The University of Western Australia",

}

Strehlow, BW 2017, 'The effects of sediments on marine sponges', Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Western Australia. https://doi.org/10.4225/23/5a5c0141cb4de

The effects of sediments on marine sponges. / Strehlow, Brian William.

2017.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

TY - THES

T1 - The effects of sediments on marine sponges

AU - Strehlow, Brian William

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Coastal development, such as dredging, is increasing sediment loads to many marine ecosystems. The effects of increasedsediment loads on sponges were poorly known, so I used a multidisciplinary approach to assess the impact of sediments onthe survival, growth, physiology, ultrastructure and gene expression of three, abundant and broadly distributed lndo-Pacific sponge species. The most sensitive species was Carteriospongia foliascens. In comparison, Cliona orientalis exhibited limited mortality and was resilient. Finally, Ianthella basta was tolerant to sediment-related stress. Species-specific responses to stress, potential bioindicators, and stress tolerance mechanisms were identified and characterised for use by researchers, regulators and managers.

AB - Coastal development, such as dredging, is increasing sediment loads to many marine ecosystems. The effects of increasedsediment loads on sponges were poorly known, so I used a multidisciplinary approach to assess the impact of sediments onthe survival, growth, physiology, ultrastructure and gene expression of three, abundant and broadly distributed lndo-Pacific sponge species. The most sensitive species was Carteriospongia foliascens. In comparison, Cliona orientalis exhibited limited mortality and was resilient. Finally, Ianthella basta was tolerant to sediment-related stress. Species-specific responses to stress, potential bioindicators, and stress tolerance mechanisms were identified and characterised for use by researchers, regulators and managers.

KW - Sponge

KW - Dredging

KW - Elevated suspended sediment concentrations

KW - Light attenuation

KW - Sedimentation

KW - Pumping

KW - 3D X-Ray Microscopy

KW - Differential gene expression

U2 - 10.4225/23/5a5c0141cb4de

DO - 10.4225/23/5a5c0141cb4de

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

ER -