The effects of high potassium consumption on bone mineral density in a prospective cohort study of elderly postmenopausal women

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    Abstract

    Few studies have investigated the long-term effects of potassium intake on BMD. In a cohort of 266 elderly women, we found that baseline potassium intake as reflected by 24-hour urine potassium excretion had positive association with BMD measured at 1 and/or 5 years later, suggesting a role of dietary potassium on osteoporosis prevention.IntroductionHigh dietary potassium intake has been suggested to be beneficial for bone structure, but few studies have investigated the long-term effects of potassium intake on BMD in elderly women. We examined the relationship between potassium intake as reflected by 24-hour urine potassium excretion and bone density in a cohort of elderly women.MethodsThe study subjects were 266 elderly postmenopausal women aged 70–80 years. Twenty-four-hour urinary potassium excretion was determined at baseline. At one year hip DXA BMD was measured, at 5 years hip and total body DXA BMD and distal radius and tibia pQCT vBMD were measured. The effects of potassium were evaluated by ANCOVA according to the quartile of baseline urinary potassium excretion.ResultsAfter adjustment for confounding factors, subjects in the highest quartile of urinary potassium excretion had significantly higher total hip BMD at 1 (5%) and 5 years (6%), and significantly higher total body BMD (4%) and 4% distal tibia total (7%) and trabecular vBMD (11%) at 5 years than those in the lowest quartile.ConclusionsPotassium intake shows positive association with bone density in elderly women, suggesting that increasing consumption of food rich in potassium may play a role in osteoporosis prevention.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)335-340
    JournalOsteoporosis International
    Volume20
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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    Bone Density
    Potassium
    Cohort Studies
    Prospective Studies
    Dietary Potassium
    Hip
    Tibia
    Osteoporosis
    Urine
    Bone and Bones
    Food

    Cite this

    @article{1a656222965c42409fd8b8d5056e082a,
    title = "The effects of high potassium consumption on bone mineral density in a prospective cohort study of elderly postmenopausal women",
    abstract = "Few studies have investigated the long-term effects of potassium intake on BMD. In a cohort of 266 elderly women, we found that baseline potassium intake as reflected by 24-hour urine potassium excretion had positive association with BMD measured at 1 and/or 5 years later, suggesting a role of dietary potassium on osteoporosis prevention.IntroductionHigh dietary potassium intake has been suggested to be beneficial for bone structure, but few studies have investigated the long-term effects of potassium intake on BMD in elderly women. We examined the relationship between potassium intake as reflected by 24-hour urine potassium excretion and bone density in a cohort of elderly women.MethodsThe study subjects were 266 elderly postmenopausal women aged 70–80 years. Twenty-four-hour urinary potassium excretion was determined at baseline. At one year hip DXA BMD was measured, at 5 years hip and total body DXA BMD and distal radius and tibia pQCT vBMD were measured. The effects of potassium were evaluated by ANCOVA according to the quartile of baseline urinary potassium excretion.ResultsAfter adjustment for confounding factors, subjects in the highest quartile of urinary potassium excretion had significantly higher total hip BMD at 1 (5{\%}) and 5 years (6{\%}), and significantly higher total body BMD (4{\%}) and 4{\%} distal tibia total (7{\%}) and trabecular vBMD (11{\%}) at 5 years than those in the lowest quartile.ConclusionsPotassium intake shows positive association with bone density in elderly women, suggesting that increasing consumption of food rich in potassium may play a role in osteoporosis prevention.",
    author = "Kun Zhu and A. Devine and Richard Prince",
    year = "2009",
    doi = "10.1007/s00198-008-0666-3",
    language = "English",
    volume = "20",
    pages = "335--340",
    journal = "Osteoporosis International: with other metabolic bone diseases",
    issn = "0937-941X",
    publisher = "Springer",
    number = "2",

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    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The effects of high potassium consumption on bone mineral density in a prospective cohort study of elderly postmenopausal women

    AU - Zhu, Kun

    AU - Devine, A.

    AU - Prince, Richard

    PY - 2009

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    N2 - Few studies have investigated the long-term effects of potassium intake on BMD. In a cohort of 266 elderly women, we found that baseline potassium intake as reflected by 24-hour urine potassium excretion had positive association with BMD measured at 1 and/or 5 years later, suggesting a role of dietary potassium on osteoporosis prevention.IntroductionHigh dietary potassium intake has been suggested to be beneficial for bone structure, but few studies have investigated the long-term effects of potassium intake on BMD in elderly women. We examined the relationship between potassium intake as reflected by 24-hour urine potassium excretion and bone density in a cohort of elderly women.MethodsThe study subjects were 266 elderly postmenopausal women aged 70–80 years. Twenty-four-hour urinary potassium excretion was determined at baseline. At one year hip DXA BMD was measured, at 5 years hip and total body DXA BMD and distal radius and tibia pQCT vBMD were measured. The effects of potassium were evaluated by ANCOVA according to the quartile of baseline urinary potassium excretion.ResultsAfter adjustment for confounding factors, subjects in the highest quartile of urinary potassium excretion had significantly higher total hip BMD at 1 (5%) and 5 years (6%), and significantly higher total body BMD (4%) and 4% distal tibia total (7%) and trabecular vBMD (11%) at 5 years than those in the lowest quartile.ConclusionsPotassium intake shows positive association with bone density in elderly women, suggesting that increasing consumption of food rich in potassium may play a role in osteoporosis prevention.

    AB - Few studies have investigated the long-term effects of potassium intake on BMD. In a cohort of 266 elderly women, we found that baseline potassium intake as reflected by 24-hour urine potassium excretion had positive association with BMD measured at 1 and/or 5 years later, suggesting a role of dietary potassium on osteoporosis prevention.IntroductionHigh dietary potassium intake has been suggested to be beneficial for bone structure, but few studies have investigated the long-term effects of potassium intake on BMD in elderly women. We examined the relationship between potassium intake as reflected by 24-hour urine potassium excretion and bone density in a cohort of elderly women.MethodsThe study subjects were 266 elderly postmenopausal women aged 70–80 years. Twenty-four-hour urinary potassium excretion was determined at baseline. At one year hip DXA BMD was measured, at 5 years hip and total body DXA BMD and distal radius and tibia pQCT vBMD were measured. The effects of potassium were evaluated by ANCOVA according to the quartile of baseline urinary potassium excretion.ResultsAfter adjustment for confounding factors, subjects in the highest quartile of urinary potassium excretion had significantly higher total hip BMD at 1 (5%) and 5 years (6%), and significantly higher total body BMD (4%) and 4% distal tibia total (7%) and trabecular vBMD (11%) at 5 years than those in the lowest quartile.ConclusionsPotassium intake shows positive association with bone density in elderly women, suggesting that increasing consumption of food rich in potassium may play a role in osteoporosis prevention.

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