The effects of high-intensity, intermittent exercise on energy intake and its regulation: implications for exercise guidelines for appetite control

Yueren Sim

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    143 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    [Truncated] It is well established that exercise plays an important role in the management of overweight and obesity. In the past, this was primarily attributed to the direct contribution of exercise to energy expenditure, however it is becoming increasingly evident that exercise may also influence appetite and energy intake. Importantly, the precise effect of exercise on appetite and energy intake appears to be influenced by specific characteristics of the exercise. In particular, high-intensity exercise appears to have beneficial (anorexic) effects on appetite and energy intake. Prolonged and continuous high-intensity exercise may however, not be tolerable and sustainable in an inactive and overweight population. An alternative may be the use of high-intensity, intermittent exercise that involves short bouts of high-intensity exercise interspersed with periods of exercise at lower intensities. However, the effects of high-intensity, intermittent exercise on energy intake and appetite regulation is not known. The research presented in this thesis examines the acute and longer term influence of high-intensity, intermittent exercise compared with traditional moderate-intensity, continuous exercise on subsequent energy intake, perceptions of appetite and appetite-related blood variables in sedentary, overweight men.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2015

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