The effects of gemcitabine on antigen-specific anti-tumour immunity in a murine tumour model

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

[Truncated] Cytotoxic chemotherapy is an important and commonly used modality of cancer treatment. Although most cytotoxic drugs cause neutropenia and lymphopenia, and are considered immunosuppressive, there are few data on the effects of chemotherapy on the humoral and cellular immune responses to specific tumour antigens. In order to bring together chemotherapy and immunotherapies, it is important to understand the effects chemotherapy on the immune response, and how to rationally combine these treatments.

My first aim was to study the effects of the cytotoxic drug gemcitabine on the humoral and cellular response to a specific tumour antigen in a solid tumour model. I used a tumour model system in which a murine mesothelioma cell line has been transfected with the influenza haemagglutinin antigen (AB1-HA). A gemcitabine-resistant line of AB1-HA was also generated. Changes in the immune response to HA were followed using various tools including anti-HATCR transgenic lymphocytes.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2002

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  • This thesis has been made available in the UWA Profiles and Research Repository as part of a UWA Library project to digitise and make available theses completed before 2003. If you are the author of this thesis and would like it removed from the UWA Profiles and Research Repository, please contact digitaltheses-lib@uwa.edu.au

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