The Effect of the Social and Physical Environment on Children's Independent Mobility to Neighborhood Destinations

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Abstract

METHODS: Parents in RESIDE's fourth survey reported whether their child (8-15 years; n = 181) was allowed to travel without an adult to school, friend's house, park and local shop. Objective physical environment measures were matched to each of these destinations. Social environment measures included neighborhood perceptions and items specific to local independent mobility. RESULTS: Independent mobility to local destinations ranged from 30% to 48%. Independent mobility to a local park was less likely as the distance to the closest park (small and large size) increased and less likely with additional school grounds (P <.05). Independent mobility to school was less likely as the distance to the closest large park increased and if the neighborhood was perceived as unsafe (P <.05). Independent mobility to a park or shops decreased if parenting social norms were unsupportive of children's local independent movement (P <.05). CONCLUSIONS: Independent mobility appears dependent upon the specific destination being visited and the impact of neighborhood features varies according to the destination examined. Findings highlight the importance of access to different types and sizes of urban green space for children's independent mobility to parks. BACKGROUND: Relationships between context-specific measures of the physical and social environment and children's independent mobility to neighborhood destination types were examined.
LanguageEnglish
PagesS84-S93
JournalJournal of Physical Activity & Health
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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@article{aab62c0129c74bdc88d68ed021cf4f4f,
title = "The Effect of the Social and Physical Environment on Children's Independent Mobility to Neighborhood Destinations",
abstract = "METHODS: Parents in RESIDE's fourth survey reported whether their child (8-15 years; n = 181) was allowed to travel without an adult to school, friend's house, park and local shop. Objective physical environment measures were matched to each of these destinations. Social environment measures included neighborhood perceptions and items specific to local independent mobility. RESULTS: Independent mobility to local destinations ranged from 30{\%} to 48{\%}. Independent mobility to a local park was less likely as the distance to the closest park (small and large size) increased and less likely with additional school grounds (P <.05). Independent mobility to school was less likely as the distance to the closest large park increased and if the neighborhood was perceived as unsafe (P <.05). Independent mobility to a park or shops decreased if parenting social norms were unsupportive of children's local independent movement (P <.05). CONCLUSIONS: Independent mobility appears dependent upon the specific destination being visited and the impact of neighborhood features varies according to the destination examined. Findings highlight the importance of access to different types and sizes of urban green space for children's independent mobility to parks. BACKGROUND: Relationships between context-specific measures of the physical and social environment and children's independent mobility to neighborhood destination types were examined.",
author = "Hayley Christian and C.D. Klinker and Karen Villanueva and Matthew Knuiman and Sarah Foster and Stephen Zubrick and Mark Divitini and Lisa Wood and Billie Giles-Corti",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1123/jpah.2014-0271",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "S84--S93",
journal = "Journal of Physical Activity & Health",
issn = "1543-3080",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Effect of the Social and Physical Environment on Children's Independent Mobility to Neighborhood Destinations

AU - Christian,Hayley

AU - Klinker,C.D.

AU - Villanueva,Karen

AU - Knuiman,Matthew

AU - Foster,Sarah

AU - Zubrick,Stephen

AU - Divitini,Mark

AU - Wood,Lisa

AU - Giles-Corti,Billie

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - METHODS: Parents in RESIDE's fourth survey reported whether their child (8-15 years; n = 181) was allowed to travel without an adult to school, friend's house, park and local shop. Objective physical environment measures were matched to each of these destinations. Social environment measures included neighborhood perceptions and items specific to local independent mobility. RESULTS: Independent mobility to local destinations ranged from 30% to 48%. Independent mobility to a local park was less likely as the distance to the closest park (small and large size) increased and less likely with additional school grounds (P <.05). Independent mobility to school was less likely as the distance to the closest large park increased and if the neighborhood was perceived as unsafe (P <.05). Independent mobility to a park or shops decreased if parenting social norms were unsupportive of children's local independent movement (P <.05). CONCLUSIONS: Independent mobility appears dependent upon the specific destination being visited and the impact of neighborhood features varies according to the destination examined. Findings highlight the importance of access to different types and sizes of urban green space for children's independent mobility to parks. BACKGROUND: Relationships between context-specific measures of the physical and social environment and children's independent mobility to neighborhood destination types were examined.

AB - METHODS: Parents in RESIDE's fourth survey reported whether their child (8-15 years; n = 181) was allowed to travel without an adult to school, friend's house, park and local shop. Objective physical environment measures were matched to each of these destinations. Social environment measures included neighborhood perceptions and items specific to local independent mobility. RESULTS: Independent mobility to local destinations ranged from 30% to 48%. Independent mobility to a local park was less likely as the distance to the closest park (small and large size) increased and less likely with additional school grounds (P <.05). Independent mobility to school was less likely as the distance to the closest large park increased and if the neighborhood was perceived as unsafe (P <.05). Independent mobility to a park or shops decreased if parenting social norms were unsupportive of children's local independent movement (P <.05). CONCLUSIONS: Independent mobility appears dependent upon the specific destination being visited and the impact of neighborhood features varies according to the destination examined. Findings highlight the importance of access to different types and sizes of urban green space for children's independent mobility to parks. BACKGROUND: Relationships between context-specific measures of the physical and social environment and children's independent mobility to neighborhood destination types were examined.

U2 - 10.1123/jpah.2014-0271

DO - 10.1123/jpah.2014-0271

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - S84-S93

JO - Journal of Physical Activity & Health

T2 - Journal of Physical Activity & Health

JF - Journal of Physical Activity & Health

SN - 1543-3080

ER -