The effect of surfactant chain length on the morphology of poly(methyl methacrylate) microcapsules for fragrance oil encapsulation

Alison Louise Tasker, James Paul Hitchcock, Ling He, Elaine Alice Baxter, Simon Biggs, Olivier Jean Cayre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The solvent evaporation method for producing microcapsules relies upon the correct wetting conditions between the three phases involved in the synthesis to allow core-shell morphologies to form. By measuring the interfacial tensions between the oil, polymer and aqueous phases, spreading coefficients can be calculated, allowing the capsule morphology to be predicted. In this work we explore the effect of surfactant chain length on capsule morphology using poly(methyl methacrylate) as the polymer and hexadecane as the core. We compared the predicted morphologies obtained using the polymer as a solid, and the polymer dissolved in dichloromethane to represent the point at which capsule formation begins. We found that using the polymer in its final, solid form gave predictions which were more consistent with our observations. The method was applied to successfully predict the capsule morphologies obtained when commercial fragrance oils were encapsulated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-16
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Colloid and Interface Science
Volume484
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Dec 2016
Externally publishedYes

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