The effect of slow-motion imagery on performance of a complex motor skill

Rodney Wade Wilcox

Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

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Abstract

purpose of this study was to examine the effect of slow-motion imagery on the performance of a complex motor skill using a single subject multiple baseline across individuals design. Five intermediate level long jumpers (male and female, ages15 - 19) participated in long jump training sessions during a 2 - 5 week baseline period and an 8 week slow-motion imagery training period. The dependent measures of jump distance, accuracy of take off, and subjective rating of style and technique from along jump expert, were hypothesized to be enhanced by slow-motion imagery training. Physical self-efficacy and locus of control were also hypothesized to be enhanced by the treatment and were measured pre and post test along with imagery ability. Results indicated three subjects that significantly improved imagery ability also improved imagery enhanced jumping performance over baseline performance. Two subjects did not significantly improve imagery ability and did not improve imagery enhanced jumping performance. Generally, subjects whose jumping performance improved also widened and enhanced physical self-efficacy and internalized locus of control. Therefore, results suggest that slow-motion imagery training will enhance the performance of a complex motor skill provided there is a consistent improvement in imagery ability.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationMasters
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 1991

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Motor Skills
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Aptitude
Internal-External Control
Self Efficacy

Bibliographical note

This thesis has been made available in the UWA Profiles and Research Repository as part of a UWA Library project to digitise and make available theses completed before 2003. If you are the author of this thesis and would like it removed from the UWA Profiles and Research Repository, please contact digitaltheses-lib@uwa.edu.au

Cite this

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title = "The effect of slow-motion imagery on performance of a complex motor skill",
abstract = "purpose of this study was to examine the effect of slow-motion imagery on the performance of a complex motor skill using a single subject multiple baseline across individuals design. Five intermediate level long jumpers (male and female, ages15 - 19) participated in long jump training sessions during a 2 - 5 week baseline period and an 8 week slow-motion imagery training period. The dependent measures of jump distance, accuracy of take off, and subjective rating of style and technique from along jump expert, were hypothesized to be enhanced by slow-motion imagery training. Physical self-efficacy and locus of control were also hypothesized to be enhanced by the treatment and were measured pre and post test along with imagery ability. Results indicated three subjects that significantly improved imagery ability also improved imagery enhanced jumping performance over baseline performance. Two subjects did not significantly improve imagery ability and did not improve imagery enhanced jumping performance. Generally, subjects whose jumping performance improved also widened and enhanced physical self-efficacy and internalized locus of control. Therefore, results suggest that slow-motion imagery training will enhance the performance of a complex motor skill provided there is a consistent improvement in imagery ability.",
author = "Wilcox, {Rodney Wade}",
note = "This thesis has been made available in the UWA Profiles and Research Repository as part of a UWA Library project to digitise and make available theses completed before 2003. If you are the author of this thesis and would like it removed from the UWA Profiles and Research Repository, please contact digitaltheses-lib@uwa.edu.au",
year = "1991",
doi = "10.26182/5c6a089aa4bbe",
language = "English",
school = "The University of Western Australia",

}

The effect of slow-motion imagery on performance of a complex motor skill. / Wilcox, Rodney Wade.

1991.

Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

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T1 - The effect of slow-motion imagery on performance of a complex motor skill

AU - Wilcox, Rodney Wade

N1 - This thesis has been made available in the UWA Profiles and Research Repository as part of a UWA Library project to digitise and make available theses completed before 2003. If you are the author of this thesis and would like it removed from the UWA Profiles and Research Repository, please contact digitaltheses-lib@uwa.edu.au

PY - 1991

Y1 - 1991

N2 - purpose of this study was to examine the effect of slow-motion imagery on the performance of a complex motor skill using a single subject multiple baseline across individuals design. Five intermediate level long jumpers (male and female, ages15 - 19) participated in long jump training sessions during a 2 - 5 week baseline period and an 8 week slow-motion imagery training period. The dependent measures of jump distance, accuracy of take off, and subjective rating of style and technique from along jump expert, were hypothesized to be enhanced by slow-motion imagery training. Physical self-efficacy and locus of control were also hypothesized to be enhanced by the treatment and were measured pre and post test along with imagery ability. Results indicated three subjects that significantly improved imagery ability also improved imagery enhanced jumping performance over baseline performance. Two subjects did not significantly improve imagery ability and did not improve imagery enhanced jumping performance. Generally, subjects whose jumping performance improved also widened and enhanced physical self-efficacy and internalized locus of control. Therefore, results suggest that slow-motion imagery training will enhance the performance of a complex motor skill provided there is a consistent improvement in imagery ability.

AB - purpose of this study was to examine the effect of slow-motion imagery on the performance of a complex motor skill using a single subject multiple baseline across individuals design. Five intermediate level long jumpers (male and female, ages15 - 19) participated in long jump training sessions during a 2 - 5 week baseline period and an 8 week slow-motion imagery training period. The dependent measures of jump distance, accuracy of take off, and subjective rating of style and technique from along jump expert, were hypothesized to be enhanced by slow-motion imagery training. Physical self-efficacy and locus of control were also hypothesized to be enhanced by the treatment and were measured pre and post test along with imagery ability. Results indicated three subjects that significantly improved imagery ability also improved imagery enhanced jumping performance over baseline performance. Two subjects did not significantly improve imagery ability and did not improve imagery enhanced jumping performance. Generally, subjects whose jumping performance improved also widened and enhanced physical self-efficacy and internalized locus of control. Therefore, results suggest that slow-motion imagery training will enhance the performance of a complex motor skill provided there is a consistent improvement in imagery ability.

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DO - 10.26182/5c6a089aa4bbe

M3 - Master's Thesis

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