The effect of root system form and function on nitrate uptake by lupins in a leaching environment

Vanessa Maree Dunbabin

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    8 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    [Truncated] Lupin crops form an important component of farming systems in Western Australia. However, the ability of lupins to fix large quantities of atmospheric nitrogen results in a low rate of nitrogen uptake from soil. Mineralised nitrate left to accumulate in sandy soils is at risk of leaching beyond the rooting zone, a process that contributes to topsoil acidification. While the distribution and function of roots determine the success with which a plant can acquire nutrients, the relationship between the form of lupin root systems, and their ability to capture nitrate from leaching environments, remains unstudied. To address this deficiency, this study investigates the ability of lupins to use root plasticity responses to enhance nitrate acquisition, and the close link between plasticity and root architectural form.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    DOIs
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2002

    Take-down notice

    This thesis has been made available in the UWA Profiles and Research Repository as part of a UWA Library project to digitise and make available theses completed before 2003. If you are the author of this thesis and would like it removed from the UWA Profiles and Research Repository, please contact digitaltheses-lib@uwa.edu.au

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of root system form and function on nitrate uptake by lupins in a leaching environment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this