The effect of regular consumption of lupin-containing foods on glycaemic control and blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus

Natalie C Ward, Trevor A Mori, Lawrence J Beilin, Stuart Johnson, Carolyn Williams, Seng Khee Gan, Ian B Puddey, Richard Woodman, Michael Phillips, Emma Connolly, Jonathan M Hodgson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by high glucose and insulin resistance. It is strongly linked to lifestyle, including poor diet and physical inactivity. Lupin is a novel food ingredient, rich in protein and fibre with negligible sugar and starch, which can be incorporated into various foods to reduce glycaemic load. Regular consumption of lupin-enriched foods may be a novel and easily achievable means of reducing overall glycaemic load and improving glycaemic control in diabetes.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether regular consumption of lupin-enriched foods can improve glycaemic control and lower blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

DESIGN: Fourteen men and 8 women (mean age 58.0 ± 6.6 years and BMI 29.0 ± 3.5 kg m-2) with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited from the general population to take part in a double-blind, randomised, controlled cross-over study. Participants consumed lupin or control foods for breakfast and lunch every day, and for dinner at least 3 days per week during the 8-week treatment periods. Lupin-enriched foods consisted of bread, pasta, Weetbix™ cereal and crumbs, with energy-matched control products. Treatments were completed in random order with an 8-week washout period. All participants monitored their blood glucose levels pre- and post-breakfast and lunch, and their blood pressure in the morning and evening, 3 days per week for the duration of each treatment period.

RESULTS: Seventeen participants completed both treatment arms, with all 22 participants (14 males, 8 females) analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Eight weeks consumption of lupin-enriched food had no significant effect on mean blood glucose levels (mean difference: -0.08 ± 0.06 mmol L-1, p = 0.214) or post-prandial blood glucose levels (-0.13 ± 0.10 mmol L-1, p = 0.196). There was no effect on home systolic (-0.4 ± 0.4 mmHg, p = 0.33) or diastolic (0.3 ± 0.3 mmHg, p = 0.321) blood pressure and heart rate (0.5 ± 0.3 bpm, p = 0.152), and no effect on body weight throughout the treatment periods.

CONCLUSION: Regular consumption of lupin-enriched foods had no significant effect on glycaemic control or blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)741-747
JournalFood & function
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Jan 2020

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Fortified Food
Lupinus
glycemic control
noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus
enriched foods
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
blood pressure
Breakfast
Blood Pressure
Food
Blood Glucose
Lunch
breakfast
blood glucose
Meals
lunch
Therapeutics
Bread
Starch
Cross-Over Studies

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@article{da6c7be035154929b3d61044b4ec77c1,
title = "The effect of regular consumption of lupin-containing foods on glycaemic control and blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by high glucose and insulin resistance. It is strongly linked to lifestyle, including poor diet and physical inactivity. Lupin is a novel food ingredient, rich in protein and fibre with negligible sugar and starch, which can be incorporated into various foods to reduce glycaemic load. Regular consumption of lupin-enriched foods may be a novel and easily achievable means of reducing overall glycaemic load and improving glycaemic control in diabetes.OBJECTIVE: To determine whether regular consumption of lupin-enriched foods can improve glycaemic control and lower blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.DESIGN: Fourteen men and 8 women (mean age 58.0 ± 6.6 years and BMI 29.0 ± 3.5 kg m-2) with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited from the general population to take part in a double-blind, randomised, controlled cross-over study. Participants consumed lupin or control foods for breakfast and lunch every day, and for dinner at least 3 days per week during the 8-week treatment periods. Lupin-enriched foods consisted of bread, pasta, Weetbix™ cereal and crumbs, with energy-matched control products. Treatments were completed in random order with an 8-week washout period. All participants monitored their blood glucose levels pre- and post-breakfast and lunch, and their blood pressure in the morning and evening, 3 days per week for the duration of each treatment period.RESULTS: Seventeen participants completed both treatment arms, with all 22 participants (14 males, 8 females) analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Eight weeks consumption of lupin-enriched food had no significant effect on mean blood glucose levels (mean difference: -0.08 ± 0.06 mmol L-1, p = 0.214) or post-prandial blood glucose levels (-0.13 ± 0.10 mmol L-1, p = 0.196). There was no effect on home systolic (-0.4 ± 0.4 mmHg, p = 0.33) or diastolic (0.3 ± 0.3 mmHg, p = 0.321) blood pressure and heart rate (0.5 ± 0.3 bpm, p = 0.152), and no effect on body weight throughout the treatment periods.CONCLUSION: Regular consumption of lupin-enriched foods had no significant effect on glycaemic control or blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.",
author = "Ward, {Natalie C} and Mori, {Trevor A} and Beilin, {Lawrence J} and Stuart Johnson and Carolyn Williams and Gan, {Seng Khee} and Puddey, {Ian B} and Richard Woodman and Michael Phillips and Emma Connolly and Hodgson, {Jonathan M}",
year = "2020",
month = "1",
day = "29",
doi = "10.1039/c9fo01778j",
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journal = "Food & function",
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The effect of regular consumption of lupin-containing foods on glycaemic control and blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. / Ward, Natalie C; Mori, Trevor A; Beilin, Lawrence J; Johnson, Stuart; Williams, Carolyn; Gan, Seng Khee; Puddey, Ian B; Woodman, Richard; Phillips, Michael; Connolly, Emma; Hodgson, Jonathan M.

In: Food & function, Vol. 11, No. 1, 29.01.2020, p. 741-747.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of regular consumption of lupin-containing foods on glycaemic control and blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus

AU - Ward, Natalie C

AU - Mori, Trevor A

AU - Beilin, Lawrence J

AU - Johnson, Stuart

AU - Williams, Carolyn

AU - Gan, Seng Khee

AU - Puddey, Ian B

AU - Woodman, Richard

AU - Phillips, Michael

AU - Connolly, Emma

AU - Hodgson, Jonathan M

PY - 2020/1/29

Y1 - 2020/1/29

N2 - BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by high glucose and insulin resistance. It is strongly linked to lifestyle, including poor diet and physical inactivity. Lupin is a novel food ingredient, rich in protein and fibre with negligible sugar and starch, which can be incorporated into various foods to reduce glycaemic load. Regular consumption of lupin-enriched foods may be a novel and easily achievable means of reducing overall glycaemic load and improving glycaemic control in diabetes.OBJECTIVE: To determine whether regular consumption of lupin-enriched foods can improve glycaemic control and lower blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.DESIGN: Fourteen men and 8 women (mean age 58.0 ± 6.6 years and BMI 29.0 ± 3.5 kg m-2) with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited from the general population to take part in a double-blind, randomised, controlled cross-over study. Participants consumed lupin or control foods for breakfast and lunch every day, and for dinner at least 3 days per week during the 8-week treatment periods. Lupin-enriched foods consisted of bread, pasta, Weetbix™ cereal and crumbs, with energy-matched control products. Treatments were completed in random order with an 8-week washout period. All participants monitored their blood glucose levels pre- and post-breakfast and lunch, and their blood pressure in the morning and evening, 3 days per week for the duration of each treatment period.RESULTS: Seventeen participants completed both treatment arms, with all 22 participants (14 males, 8 females) analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Eight weeks consumption of lupin-enriched food had no significant effect on mean blood glucose levels (mean difference: -0.08 ± 0.06 mmol L-1, p = 0.214) or post-prandial blood glucose levels (-0.13 ± 0.10 mmol L-1, p = 0.196). There was no effect on home systolic (-0.4 ± 0.4 mmHg, p = 0.33) or diastolic (0.3 ± 0.3 mmHg, p = 0.321) blood pressure and heart rate (0.5 ± 0.3 bpm, p = 0.152), and no effect on body weight throughout the treatment periods.CONCLUSION: Regular consumption of lupin-enriched foods had no significant effect on glycaemic control or blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

AB - BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by high glucose and insulin resistance. It is strongly linked to lifestyle, including poor diet and physical inactivity. Lupin is a novel food ingredient, rich in protein and fibre with negligible sugar and starch, which can be incorporated into various foods to reduce glycaemic load. Regular consumption of lupin-enriched foods may be a novel and easily achievable means of reducing overall glycaemic load and improving glycaemic control in diabetes.OBJECTIVE: To determine whether regular consumption of lupin-enriched foods can improve glycaemic control and lower blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.DESIGN: Fourteen men and 8 women (mean age 58.0 ± 6.6 years and BMI 29.0 ± 3.5 kg m-2) with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited from the general population to take part in a double-blind, randomised, controlled cross-over study. Participants consumed lupin or control foods for breakfast and lunch every day, and for dinner at least 3 days per week during the 8-week treatment periods. Lupin-enriched foods consisted of bread, pasta, Weetbix™ cereal and crumbs, with energy-matched control products. Treatments were completed in random order with an 8-week washout period. All participants monitored their blood glucose levels pre- and post-breakfast and lunch, and their blood pressure in the morning and evening, 3 days per week for the duration of each treatment period.RESULTS: Seventeen participants completed both treatment arms, with all 22 participants (14 males, 8 females) analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Eight weeks consumption of lupin-enriched food had no significant effect on mean blood glucose levels (mean difference: -0.08 ± 0.06 mmol L-1, p = 0.214) or post-prandial blood glucose levels (-0.13 ± 0.10 mmol L-1, p = 0.196). There was no effect on home systolic (-0.4 ± 0.4 mmHg, p = 0.33) or diastolic (0.3 ± 0.3 mmHg, p = 0.321) blood pressure and heart rate (0.5 ± 0.3 bpm, p = 0.152), and no effect on body weight throughout the treatment periods.CONCLUSION: Regular consumption of lupin-enriched foods had no significant effect on glycaemic control or blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

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DO - 10.1039/c9fo01778j

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VL - 11

SP - 741

EP - 747

JO - Food & function

JF - Food & function

SN - 2042-6496

IS - 1

ER -