The effect of parental logistic support on physical activity in children with, or at risk of, movement difficulties

Kemi E. Wright, Bonnie J. Furzer, Melissa K. Licari, James A. Dimmock, Ben Jackson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: In a sample of children with, or at risk of, movement difficulties, (1) To test the direct effects of children's perceptions of parents’ logistic support for physical activity on children's physical activity-related self-perceptions and on children's physical activity levels, and (2) To explore the indirect relationship between children's perceptions of parents’ logistic support for physical activity and children's physical activity levels through children's physical activity-related self-perceptions. Design: Cross-sectional observation study. Methods: Data were collected from 120 children aged 6 to 12 years; movement proficiency levels were determined using the movement assessment battery for children-2 test. Children's perspectives of parental support for physical activity were captured using the Activity Support Scale for Multiple Groups child report. Children's self-perceptions towards physical activity were reported with the Children's Self- perceptions of Adequacy in and Predilections for physical activity, and time spent in physical activity were measured using accelerometers. Results: There was no significant direct effect between perceived levels of parents’ logistic support for physical activity and children's physical activity. A significant indirect relationship between these variables was discovered, with higher perceived levels of parent logistical support for physical activity predicting stronger perceptions of adequacy (i.e., confidence) toward physical activity participation among children, which in turn was associated with increased physical activity minutes. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that irrespective of a child's movement ability, children's perceptions of parents’ logistic support for physical activity indirectly and positively predicts children's physical activity levels, via children's confidence for physical activity.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 22 Oct 2019

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Exercise
Self Concept
Parents
Aptitude
Cross-Sectional Studies
Observation

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@article{300e145564de479b98892854076b5059,
title = "The effect of parental logistic support on physical activity in children with, or at risk of, movement difficulties",
abstract = "Objectives: In a sample of children with, or at risk of, movement difficulties, (1) To test the direct effects of children's perceptions of parents’ logistic support for physical activity on children's physical activity-related self-perceptions and on children's physical activity levels, and (2) To explore the indirect relationship between children's perceptions of parents’ logistic support for physical activity and children's physical activity levels through children's physical activity-related self-perceptions. Design: Cross-sectional observation study. Methods: Data were collected from 120 children aged 6 to 12 years; movement proficiency levels were determined using the movement assessment battery for children-2 test. Children's perspectives of parental support for physical activity were captured using the Activity Support Scale for Multiple Groups child report. Children's self-perceptions towards physical activity were reported with the Children's Self- perceptions of Adequacy in and Predilections for physical activity, and time spent in physical activity were measured using accelerometers. Results: There was no significant direct effect between perceived levels of parents’ logistic support for physical activity and children's physical activity. A significant indirect relationship between these variables was discovered, with higher perceived levels of parent logistical support for physical activity predicting stronger perceptions of adequacy (i.e., confidence) toward physical activity participation among children, which in turn was associated with increased physical activity minutes. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that irrespective of a child's movement ability, children's perceptions of parents’ logistic support for physical activity indirectly and positively predicts children's physical activity levels, via children's confidence for physical activity.",
keywords = "Accelerometery, Confidence, Low movement proficiency, Parent support, Participation, Physical activity",
author = "Wright, {Kemi E.} and Furzer, {Bonnie J.} and Licari, {Melissa K.} and Dimmock, {James A.} and Ben Jackson",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsams.2019.10.005",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport",
issn = "1440-2440",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of parental logistic support on physical activity in children with, or at risk of, movement difficulties

AU - Wright, Kemi E.

AU - Furzer, Bonnie J.

AU - Licari, Melissa K.

AU - Dimmock, James A.

AU - Jackson, Ben

PY - 2019/10/22

Y1 - 2019/10/22

N2 - Objectives: In a sample of children with, or at risk of, movement difficulties, (1) To test the direct effects of children's perceptions of parents’ logistic support for physical activity on children's physical activity-related self-perceptions and on children's physical activity levels, and (2) To explore the indirect relationship between children's perceptions of parents’ logistic support for physical activity and children's physical activity levels through children's physical activity-related self-perceptions. Design: Cross-sectional observation study. Methods: Data were collected from 120 children aged 6 to 12 years; movement proficiency levels were determined using the movement assessment battery for children-2 test. Children's perspectives of parental support for physical activity were captured using the Activity Support Scale for Multiple Groups child report. Children's self-perceptions towards physical activity were reported with the Children's Self- perceptions of Adequacy in and Predilections for physical activity, and time spent in physical activity were measured using accelerometers. Results: There was no significant direct effect between perceived levels of parents’ logistic support for physical activity and children's physical activity. A significant indirect relationship between these variables was discovered, with higher perceived levels of parent logistical support for physical activity predicting stronger perceptions of adequacy (i.e., confidence) toward physical activity participation among children, which in turn was associated with increased physical activity minutes. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that irrespective of a child's movement ability, children's perceptions of parents’ logistic support for physical activity indirectly and positively predicts children's physical activity levels, via children's confidence for physical activity.

AB - Objectives: In a sample of children with, or at risk of, movement difficulties, (1) To test the direct effects of children's perceptions of parents’ logistic support for physical activity on children's physical activity-related self-perceptions and on children's physical activity levels, and (2) To explore the indirect relationship between children's perceptions of parents’ logistic support for physical activity and children's physical activity levels through children's physical activity-related self-perceptions. Design: Cross-sectional observation study. Methods: Data were collected from 120 children aged 6 to 12 years; movement proficiency levels were determined using the movement assessment battery for children-2 test. Children's perspectives of parental support for physical activity were captured using the Activity Support Scale for Multiple Groups child report. Children's self-perceptions towards physical activity were reported with the Children's Self- perceptions of Adequacy in and Predilections for physical activity, and time spent in physical activity were measured using accelerometers. Results: There was no significant direct effect between perceived levels of parents’ logistic support for physical activity and children's physical activity. A significant indirect relationship between these variables was discovered, with higher perceived levels of parent logistical support for physical activity predicting stronger perceptions of adequacy (i.e., confidence) toward physical activity participation among children, which in turn was associated with increased physical activity minutes. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that irrespective of a child's movement ability, children's perceptions of parents’ logistic support for physical activity indirectly and positively predicts children's physical activity levels, via children's confidence for physical activity.

KW - Accelerometery

KW - Confidence

KW - Low movement proficiency

KW - Parent support

KW - Participation

KW - Physical activity

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.10.005

DO - 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.10.005

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

JF - Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

SN - 1440-2440

ER -