The effect of maternal and paternal immune challenge on offspring immunity and reproduction in a cricket

Kathryn Mcnamara, Emile Van Lieshout, Leigh Simmons

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Trans-generational immune priming is the transmission of enhanced immunity to offspring following a parental immune challenge. Although within-generation increased investment into immunity demonstrates clear costs on reproductive investment in a number of taxa, the potential for immune priming to impact on offspring reproductive investment has not been thoroughly investigated. We explored the reproductive costs of immune priming in a field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus. To assess the relative importance of maternal and paternal immune status, mothers and fathers were immune-challenged with live bacteria or a control solution and assigned to one of four treatments in which one parent, neither or both parents were immune-challenged. Families of offspring were reared to adulthood under a food-restricted diet, and approximately 10 offspring in each family were assayed for two measures of immunocompetence. We additionally quantified offspring reproductive investment using sperm viability for males and ovary mass for females. We demonstrate that parental immune challenge has significant consequences for the immunocompetence and, in turn, reproductive investment of their male offspring. A complex interaction between maternal and paternal immune status increased the antibacterial immune response of male offspring. This increased immune response was associated with a reduction in son's sperm viability, implicating a trans-generational resource trade-off between investment into immunocompetence and reproduction. Our data also show that these costs are sexually dimorphic, as daughters did not demonstrate a similar increase in immunity, despite showing a reduction in ovary mass. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1020-1028
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Evolutionary Biology
    Volume27
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    paternal effect
    immunocompetence
    cricket
    Gryllidae
    immunity
    maternal effect
    spermatozoa
    Teleogryllus oceanicus
    immune response
    viability
    fathers
    adulthood
    sperm
    reproductive cost
    Biological Sciences
    bacteria
    evolutionary biology
    cost
    diet
    trade-off

    Cite this

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    title = "The effect of maternal and paternal immune challenge on offspring immunity and reproduction in a cricket",
    abstract = "Trans-generational immune priming is the transmission of enhanced immunity to offspring following a parental immune challenge. Although within-generation increased investment into immunity demonstrates clear costs on reproductive investment in a number of taxa, the potential for immune priming to impact on offspring reproductive investment has not been thoroughly investigated. We explored the reproductive costs of immune priming in a field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus. To assess the relative importance of maternal and paternal immune status, mothers and fathers were immune-challenged with live bacteria or a control solution and assigned to one of four treatments in which one parent, neither or both parents were immune-challenged. Families of offspring were reared to adulthood under a food-restricted diet, and approximately 10 offspring in each family were assayed for two measures of immunocompetence. We additionally quantified offspring reproductive investment using sperm viability for males and ovary mass for females. We demonstrate that parental immune challenge has significant consequences for the immunocompetence and, in turn, reproductive investment of their male offspring. A complex interaction between maternal and paternal immune status increased the antibacterial immune response of male offspring. This increased immune response was associated with a reduction in son's sperm viability, implicating a trans-generational resource trade-off between investment into immunocompetence and reproduction. Our data also show that these costs are sexually dimorphic, as daughters did not demonstrate a similar increase in immunity, despite showing a reduction in ovary mass. {\circledC} 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.",
    author = "Kathryn Mcnamara and {Van Lieshout}, Emile and Leigh Simmons",
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    The effect of maternal and paternal immune challenge on offspring immunity and reproduction in a cricket. / Mcnamara, Kathryn; Van Lieshout, Emile; Simmons, Leigh.

    In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, Vol. 27, No. 6, 2014, p. 1020-1028.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Mcnamara, Kathryn

    AU - Van Lieshout, Emile

    AU - Simmons, Leigh

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    AB - Trans-generational immune priming is the transmission of enhanced immunity to offspring following a parental immune challenge. Although within-generation increased investment into immunity demonstrates clear costs on reproductive investment in a number of taxa, the potential for immune priming to impact on offspring reproductive investment has not been thoroughly investigated. We explored the reproductive costs of immune priming in a field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus. To assess the relative importance of maternal and paternal immune status, mothers and fathers were immune-challenged with live bacteria or a control solution and assigned to one of four treatments in which one parent, neither or both parents were immune-challenged. Families of offspring were reared to adulthood under a food-restricted diet, and approximately 10 offspring in each family were assayed for two measures of immunocompetence. We additionally quantified offspring reproductive investment using sperm viability for males and ovary mass for females. We demonstrate that parental immune challenge has significant consequences for the immunocompetence and, in turn, reproductive investment of their male offspring. A complex interaction between maternal and paternal immune status increased the antibacterial immune response of male offspring. This increased immune response was associated with a reduction in son's sperm viability, implicating a trans-generational resource trade-off between investment into immunocompetence and reproduction. Our data also show that these costs are sexually dimorphic, as daughters did not demonstrate a similar increase in immunity, despite showing a reduction in ovary mass. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

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