The effect of level of application on the residual value of superphosphate on a sandy soil in south-western Australia

M. D.A. Bolland, N. J. Barrow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a field experiment on deep, yellow, sandy soil near Badgingarra, Western Australia, the residual value of superphosphate applied one and two years previously was measured relative to freshly-applied superphosphate using yields of narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius), barley and wheat. In addition, soil samples were collected for measurement of bicarbonate-extractable soil P. This was also used to estimate the residual value of the superphosphate. For lupins and wheat, and for bicarbonate-extractable soil P, the residual value decreased with increasing level of application. For barley grain, the residual value was not significantly affected by the level of application. The decrease in residual value of superphosphate with increasing level of application is attributed to increased leaching of applied phosphorus (P) down the profile of the sandy soils as the level of application increases. This may reduce subsequent plant yields due to the delay in seedling roots reaching the P in the soil during the crucial early stages of plant growth. For lupins, the relationship between yield and the level of superphosphate applied was markedly sigmoidal. The relationship for wheat and barley was exponential. Consequently, at suboptimal levels of P application, lupins required about two to three times more P than wheat or barley to produce the same yield. However, lupins required less P to achieve near-maximum yield.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)163-172
Number of pages10
JournalFertilizer Research
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

superphosphate
Lupinus
South Australia
sandy soil
Western Australia
sandy soils
barley
wheat
bicarbonates
bicarbonate
soil
Lupinus angustifolius
leaching
soil sampling
effect
seedling
plant growth
phosphorus
seedlings

Cite this

@article{c10f4eb8915e498286a0fc7b57812b0e,
title = "The effect of level of application on the residual value of superphosphate on a sandy soil in south-western Australia",
abstract = "In a field experiment on deep, yellow, sandy soil near Badgingarra, Western Australia, the residual value of superphosphate applied one and two years previously was measured relative to freshly-applied superphosphate using yields of narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius), barley and wheat. In addition, soil samples were collected for measurement of bicarbonate-extractable soil P. This was also used to estimate the residual value of the superphosphate. For lupins and wheat, and for bicarbonate-extractable soil P, the residual value decreased with increasing level of application. For barley grain, the residual value was not significantly affected by the level of application. The decrease in residual value of superphosphate with increasing level of application is attributed to increased leaching of applied phosphorus (P) down the profile of the sandy soils as the level of application increases. This may reduce subsequent plant yields due to the delay in seedling roots reaching the P in the soil during the crucial early stages of plant growth. For lupins, the relationship between yield and the level of superphosphate applied was markedly sigmoidal. The relationship for wheat and barley was exponential. Consequently, at suboptimal levels of P application, lupins required about two to three times more P than wheat or barley to produce the same yield. However, lupins required less P to achieve near-maximum yield.",
keywords = "barley, leaching of phosphorus, lupins, residual value, sandy soil, Superphosphate, wheat",
author = "Bolland, {M. D.A.} and Barrow, {N. J.}",
year = "1991",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/BF01048956",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "163--172",
journal = "Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems",
issn = "1385-1314",
publisher = "Kluwer Academic Publishers",
number = "2",

}

The effect of level of application on the residual value of superphosphate on a sandy soil in south-western Australia. / Bolland, M. D.A.; Barrow, N. J.

In: Fertilizer Research, Vol. 29, No. 2, 01.08.1991, p. 163-172.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of level of application on the residual value of superphosphate on a sandy soil in south-western Australia

AU - Bolland, M. D.A.

AU - Barrow, N. J.

PY - 1991/8/1

Y1 - 1991/8/1

N2 - In a field experiment on deep, yellow, sandy soil near Badgingarra, Western Australia, the residual value of superphosphate applied one and two years previously was measured relative to freshly-applied superphosphate using yields of narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius), barley and wheat. In addition, soil samples were collected for measurement of bicarbonate-extractable soil P. This was also used to estimate the residual value of the superphosphate. For lupins and wheat, and for bicarbonate-extractable soil P, the residual value decreased with increasing level of application. For barley grain, the residual value was not significantly affected by the level of application. The decrease in residual value of superphosphate with increasing level of application is attributed to increased leaching of applied phosphorus (P) down the profile of the sandy soils as the level of application increases. This may reduce subsequent plant yields due to the delay in seedling roots reaching the P in the soil during the crucial early stages of plant growth. For lupins, the relationship between yield and the level of superphosphate applied was markedly sigmoidal. The relationship for wheat and barley was exponential. Consequently, at suboptimal levels of P application, lupins required about two to three times more P than wheat or barley to produce the same yield. However, lupins required less P to achieve near-maximum yield.

AB - In a field experiment on deep, yellow, sandy soil near Badgingarra, Western Australia, the residual value of superphosphate applied one and two years previously was measured relative to freshly-applied superphosphate using yields of narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius), barley and wheat. In addition, soil samples were collected for measurement of bicarbonate-extractable soil P. This was also used to estimate the residual value of the superphosphate. For lupins and wheat, and for bicarbonate-extractable soil P, the residual value decreased with increasing level of application. For barley grain, the residual value was not significantly affected by the level of application. The decrease in residual value of superphosphate with increasing level of application is attributed to increased leaching of applied phosphorus (P) down the profile of the sandy soils as the level of application increases. This may reduce subsequent plant yields due to the delay in seedling roots reaching the P in the soil during the crucial early stages of plant growth. For lupins, the relationship between yield and the level of superphosphate applied was markedly sigmoidal. The relationship for wheat and barley was exponential. Consequently, at suboptimal levels of P application, lupins required about two to three times more P than wheat or barley to produce the same yield. However, lupins required less P to achieve near-maximum yield.

KW - barley

KW - leaching of phosphorus

KW - lupins

KW - residual value

KW - sandy soil

KW - Superphosphate

KW - wheat

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0000280186&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/BF01048956

DO - 10.1007/BF01048956

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 163

EP - 172

JO - Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems

JF - Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems

SN - 1385-1314

IS - 2

ER -