The effect of human amnion epithelial cells on lung development and inflammation in preterm lambs exposed to antenatal inflammation

Paris Clarice Papagianis, Siavash Ahmadi-Noorbakhsh, Rebecca Lim, Euan Wallace, Graeme Polglase, J. Jane Pillow, Timothy J. Moss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background Lung inflammation and impaired alveolarization are hallmarks of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). We hypothesize that human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) are anti-inflammatory and reduce lung injury in preterm lambs born after antenatal exposure to inflammation. Methods Pregnant ewes received either intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS, from E.coli 055:B5; 4mg) or saline (Sal) on day 126 of gestation. Lambs were delivered by cesarean section at 128 d gestation (term ~150 d). Lambs received intravenous hAECs (LPS/hAECs: n = 7; 30x106cells) or equivalent volumes of saline (LPS/Sal, n = 10; or Sal/Sal, n = 9) immediately after birth. Respiratory support was gradually de-escalated, aimed at early weaning from mechanical ventilation towards unassisted respiration. Lung tissue was collected 1 week after birth. Lung morphology was assessed and mRNA levels for inflammatory mediators were measured. Results Respiratory support required by LPS/hAEC lambs was not different to Sal/Sal or LPS/Sal lambs. Lung tissue:airspace ratio was lower in the LPS/Sal compared to Sal/Sal lambs (P<0.05), but not LPS/hAEC lambs. LPS/hAEC lambs tended to have increased septation in their lungs versus LPS/Sal (P = 0.08). Expression of inflammatory cytokines was highest in LPS/hAECs lambs. Conclusions Postnatal administration of a single dose of hAECs stimulates a pulmonary immune response without changing ventilator requirements in preterm lambs born after intrauterine inflammation.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0253456
JournalPLoS One
Volume16
Issue number6 June
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2021

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