The effect of diesel exhaust exposure on blood-brain barrier integrity and function in a murine model

S. Heidari Nejad, R. Takechi, B.J. Mullins, C. Giles, Alexander Larcombe, D. Bertolatti, K. Rumchev, S. Dhaliwal, J. Mamo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) is associated with vascular-based disorders. To investigate the effect of DE on blood–brain barrier (BBB) function and integrity, 8-week-old BALB/c mice were randomized to DE in a cyclical treatment regimen over a 2-week period. Functional integrity of BBB was determined by considering brain parenchymal abundance of IgG within the hippocampal formation and cortex at 6 h and 24 h intervals following final exposure treatment. Neurovascular inflammation was expressed as the abundance of glial fibrillar acidic protein. Two doses of DE were studied and compared to air-only treated mice. Mice exposed to DE had substantially greater abundance of parenchymal IgG compared to control mice not exposed to DE. Increased parenchymal glial fibrillar acidic protein at 24 h post-DE exposure suggested heightened neurovascular inflammation. Our findings are proof-of-concept that inhalation of DE can compromise BBB function and support the broader contention that DE exposure may contribute to neurovascular disease risk. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-47
JournalJournal of Applied Toxicology
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2015

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