The effect of a single, brief practice of progressive muscle relaxation after exposure to an acute stressor on subsequent energy intake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Given previous research suggests an association between stress and the intake of energy-dense foods, this study investigated whether post-stressor relaxation practice can attenuate stress-induced eating.

METHODS: Twenty-five men and women were exposed to four conditions on separate days: an acute laboratory stressor (S); acute stressor followed by 20 minutes of relaxation (SR) in the form of Abbreviated Progressive Muscle Relaxation (APMR); relaxation alone (R), and a control condition (C). Physiological and psychological responses to stress and relaxation were assessed, in addition to the subsequent energy intake of high-energy snacks.

RESULTS: Salivary cortisol, blood pressure, heart rate, and perceived stress were transiently elevated post-laboratory stressor (S and SR compared with R and C; p< 0.05). Meanwhile, perceived relaxation was acutely enhanced after APMR alone (R) compared with S, SR and C (p<0.05) and in SR (immediately after the APMR) compared with S (p<0.05). No difference in mean energy intake was observed between conditions (p>0.05). Likewise, no differences in perceived appetite or the levels of ghrelin, leptin and insulin were found between conditions (p>0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: Much variation exists in stress-induced dietary responses, and APMR either post-acute stressor or in isolation does not appear to consistently alter the intake of commonly eaten snacks.

Original languageEnglish
JournalStress and Health
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 20 Aug 2019

Fingerprint

Autogenic Training
Snacks
Energy Intake
Ghrelin
Appetite
Leptin
Hydrocortisone
Eating
Heart Rate
Insulin
Psychology
Blood Pressure
Food
Research

Cite this

@article{150d4b8e451648d7a6dde2f0b46a2ce8,
title = "The effect of a single, brief practice of progressive muscle relaxation after exposure to an acute stressor on subsequent energy intake",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Given previous research suggests an association between stress and the intake of energy-dense foods, this study investigated whether post-stressor relaxation practice can attenuate stress-induced eating.METHODS: Twenty-five men and women were exposed to four conditions on separate days: an acute laboratory stressor (S); acute stressor followed by 20 minutes of relaxation (SR) in the form of Abbreviated Progressive Muscle Relaxation (APMR); relaxation alone (R), and a control condition (C). Physiological and psychological responses to stress and relaxation were assessed, in addition to the subsequent energy intake of high-energy snacks.RESULTS: Salivary cortisol, blood pressure, heart rate, and perceived stress were transiently elevated post-laboratory stressor (S and SR compared with R and C; p< 0.05). Meanwhile, perceived relaxation was acutely enhanced after APMR alone (R) compared with S, SR and C (p<0.05) and in SR (immediately after the APMR) compared with S (p<0.05). No difference in mean energy intake was observed between conditions (p>0.05). Likewise, no differences in perceived appetite or the levels of ghrelin, leptin and insulin were found between conditions (p>0.05).CONCLUSIONS: Much variation exists in stress-induced dietary responses, and APMR either post-acute stressor or in isolation does not appear to consistently alter the intake of commonly eaten snacks.",
author = "Tasmiah Masih and Dimmock, {James A.} and Guelfi, {Kym J.}",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1002/smi.2891",
language = "English",
journal = "Stress and Health",
issn = "0748-8386",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of a single, brief practice of progressive muscle relaxation after exposure to an acute stressor on subsequent energy intake

AU - Masih, Tasmiah

AU - Dimmock, James A.

AU - Guelfi, Kym J.

PY - 2019/8/20

Y1 - 2019/8/20

N2 - BACKGROUND: Given previous research suggests an association between stress and the intake of energy-dense foods, this study investigated whether post-stressor relaxation practice can attenuate stress-induced eating.METHODS: Twenty-five men and women were exposed to four conditions on separate days: an acute laboratory stressor (S); acute stressor followed by 20 minutes of relaxation (SR) in the form of Abbreviated Progressive Muscle Relaxation (APMR); relaxation alone (R), and a control condition (C). Physiological and psychological responses to stress and relaxation were assessed, in addition to the subsequent energy intake of high-energy snacks.RESULTS: Salivary cortisol, blood pressure, heart rate, and perceived stress were transiently elevated post-laboratory stressor (S and SR compared with R and C; p< 0.05). Meanwhile, perceived relaxation was acutely enhanced after APMR alone (R) compared with S, SR and C (p<0.05) and in SR (immediately after the APMR) compared with S (p<0.05). No difference in mean energy intake was observed between conditions (p>0.05). Likewise, no differences in perceived appetite or the levels of ghrelin, leptin and insulin were found between conditions (p>0.05).CONCLUSIONS: Much variation exists in stress-induced dietary responses, and APMR either post-acute stressor or in isolation does not appear to consistently alter the intake of commonly eaten snacks.

AB - BACKGROUND: Given previous research suggests an association between stress and the intake of energy-dense foods, this study investigated whether post-stressor relaxation practice can attenuate stress-induced eating.METHODS: Twenty-five men and women were exposed to four conditions on separate days: an acute laboratory stressor (S); acute stressor followed by 20 minutes of relaxation (SR) in the form of Abbreviated Progressive Muscle Relaxation (APMR); relaxation alone (R), and a control condition (C). Physiological and psychological responses to stress and relaxation were assessed, in addition to the subsequent energy intake of high-energy snacks.RESULTS: Salivary cortisol, blood pressure, heart rate, and perceived stress were transiently elevated post-laboratory stressor (S and SR compared with R and C; p< 0.05). Meanwhile, perceived relaxation was acutely enhanced after APMR alone (R) compared with S, SR and C (p<0.05) and in SR (immediately after the APMR) compared with S (p<0.05). No difference in mean energy intake was observed between conditions (p>0.05). Likewise, no differences in perceived appetite or the levels of ghrelin, leptin and insulin were found between conditions (p>0.05).CONCLUSIONS: Much variation exists in stress-induced dietary responses, and APMR either post-acute stressor or in isolation does not appear to consistently alter the intake of commonly eaten snacks.

U2 - 10.1002/smi.2891

DO - 10.1002/smi.2891

M3 - Article

JO - Stress and Health

JF - Stress and Health

SN - 0748-8386

ER -