The economic value of pasture phases in the integrated management of annual ryegrass and wild radish in a Western Australian farming system

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17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most cropping farms in Western Australia must deal with the management of herbicide-resistant populations of weeds such as annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum Gaudin) and wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum L.). Farmers are approaching the problem of herbicide resistance by adopting integrated weed management systems, which allow weed control with a range of different techniques. One important question in the design of such systems is whether and when the benefits of including pasture in rotation with crops exceed the costs. In this paper, the multi-species resistance and integrated management model was used to investigate the value of including pasture phases in the crop rotation. The most promising of the systems examined appears to be so-called 'phase farming', involving occasional 3-year phases of pasture rather than shorter, more frequent and regular pasture phases. This approach was competitive with the best continuous cropping rotation in a number of scenarios, particularly where herbicide resistance was at high levels.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)265-271
JournalAustralian Journal of Experimental Agriculture
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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