The Detroit 562 pharyngeal immortalized cell line model for the assessment of infectivity of pathogenic neisseria sp.

Emily A. Kibble, Mitali Sarkar-Tyson, Geoffrey W. Coombs, Charlene M. Kahler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapter

Abstract

Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are obligate pathogens of the human host. Due to their adaptation to the human host, many factors required for infection are specialized for the human host to the point that natural infection processes are difficult to replicate in animal models. Immortalized human cell lines have been used to identify the host factors necessary for successful colonization of human mucosal surfaces. One such model is the Detroit 562 pharyngeal immortalized cell monolayer model which is used to measure the rate of attachment to and invasion of N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae into epithelial cells. The methodology of this assay, as well as the maintenance of Detroit 562 cells necessary for the experiment, will be described.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNeisseria meningitidis
Subtitle of host publicationMethods and Protocols
EditorsKate L. Seib, Ian R. Peak
Place of PublicationUSA
PublisherHumana Press
Pages123-133
Number of pages11
Volume1969
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-4939-9202-7
ISBN (Print)978-1-4939-9201-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Mar 2019

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume1969
ISSN (Print)1064-3745

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    Kibble, E. A., Sarkar-Tyson, M., Coombs, G. W., & Kahler, C. M. (2019). The Detroit 562 pharyngeal immortalized cell line model for the assessment of infectivity of pathogenic neisseria sp. In K. L. Seib, & I. R. Peak (Eds.), Neisseria meningitidis: Methods and Protocols (Vol. 1969, pp. 123-133). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1969). USA: Humana Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-9202-7_9