The determinants and outcomes of organisational commitment

Antonio Travaglione

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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    Abstract

    The objective of this thesis is to establish the determinants and employee behavioural outcomes of the dimensions of commitment that result in organisational effectiveness. The study initially investigated the three dimensions of affective, continuance and normative commitment as conceptualised by Allen and Meyer (1990). Using confirmatory factor analyses it was found that organisational commitment was best studied by using the two dimensions of affective and continuance commitment. The two factor commitment measurement model was able to be generalised across samples of employees in the transport, insurance, manufacturing and health industries. A causal model, incorporating the dimensions of affective and continuance commitment, tested hypotheses linking these dimensions to variables representing a number of the determinants and outcomes of commitment. The determinants were perceived organisational support, job satisfaction, training opportunities and organisational tenure. The outcomes were work effort, absenteeism and turnover intention. The results of analyses using the causal model showed that job satisfaction had a causal impact on affective commitment which in turn impacted on work effort. None of the results showed that continuance commitment was causally linked to negative employee work outcomes. No causal relationship was found between organisational tenure and the dimensions of affective and continuance commitment. The findings of this study have confirmed the pioneering work carried out by Allen and Meyer who suggested that the most effective form of commitment was affective commitment.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    DOIs
    Publication statusUnpublished - 1998

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