The curious case of Proteaceae: macrobotanical investigations at Mount Behn rockshelter, Bunuba country, Western Australia

R. Whitau, I.A. Dilkes-Hall, D. Vannieuwenhuyse, S. O’Connor, J. Balme

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Macrobotanical analyses, which offer important information about human-environment interactions of the past, are underdeveloped in Australia due to limited reference materials, poor preservation of organic remains and inadequate field sampling strategies. Wood, seeds, fibres and resin provide invaluable information on diet, technology and human-environment interaction. When excavated from stratified archaeological deposits, macrobotanical remains enable analysis at a scale that is spatio-temporally linked with human occupation, unlike broad-scale palaeo-environmental records, which defy correlation with short-time human responses. Analyses of wood charcoal and seeds were identified and analysed from Mount Behn rockshelter, Bunuba country, in the southern Kimberley region of Western Australia, where the largest stone point assemblage for the region was excavated. Neither the anthracological nor carpological records reflect the taxon richness of vegetation communities of the modern vegetation, precluding both palaeo-environmental reconstruction and in-depth exploration of resource management and use. Certain taxa are over-represented in the anthracological and carpological records, in particular, Proteaceae wood charcoal and Celtis spp. endocarps, and we explore how anthracological and carpological spectra are artefacts of preservation, with particular reference to other macrobotanical research that has been conducted in the Kimberley region and Western Australia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-36
Number of pages18
JournalAustralian Archaeology
Volume84
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Apr 2018

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interaction
artifact
reconstruction
management
resources
community
Rock Shelter
Wood
Western Australia
Charcoal
Taxon
Human Environment
Interaction
Vegetation
time
Palaeoenvironmental Reconstruction
Assemblages
Human Occupation
Diet
Resin

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Whitau, R. ; Dilkes-Hall, I.A. ; Vannieuwenhuyse, D. ; O’Connor, S. ; Balme, J. / The curious case of Proteaceae : macrobotanical investigations at Mount Behn rockshelter, Bunuba country, Western Australia. In: Australian Archaeology. 2018 ; Vol. 84, No. 1. pp. 19-36.
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The curious case of Proteaceae : macrobotanical investigations at Mount Behn rockshelter, Bunuba country, Western Australia. / Whitau, R.; Dilkes-Hall, I.A.; Vannieuwenhuyse, D.; O’Connor, S.; Balme, J.

In: Australian Archaeology, Vol. 84, No. 1, 04.2018, p. 19-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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