The conservation biology of Hemigenia exilis (Lamiaceae), a serpentine endemic from the arid zone of Western Australia

Julia Mattner

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    48 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    [Truncated] This study was instigated by the re-discovery in 1995 of Hemigenia exilis, a rare serpentine endemic in the arid zone of Western Australia. It addressed issues pertinent to five areas of conservation biology of the species. Levels and patterns of genetic diversity were quantified using RAPDs. H. exilis had a genetic diversity of 0.38 and a heterozygosity of 0.27, which is higher than the levels found in most rare, long-lived shrubs. Over 80% of the genetic variation was partitioned within populations, typical of long-lived out-crossing perennials. Importantly, the species was differentiated into a northern and southern provenance, with implications for rehabilitation of the species after mining.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    DOIs
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2002

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