The Concentration of Iron in Real-World Geogenic PM10 is Associated with Increased Inflammation and Deficits in Lung Function in Mice

Graeme Zosky, Thomas Iosifidis, Kara Perks, Will Ditcham, Sunalene Devadason, Shan Siah, Brian Devine, Fiona Maley, Angus Cook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There are many communities around the world that are exposed to high levels of particulate matter ,10 mm (PM10) of geogenic (earth derived) origin. Mineral dusts in the occupational setting are associated with poor lung health, however very little is known about the impact of heterogeneous community derived particles. We have preliminary evidence to suggest that the concentration of iron (Fe) may be associated with the lung inflammatory response to geogenic PM10. We aimed to determine which physico-chemical characteristics of community sampled geogenic PM10 are associated with adverse lung responses. Methods: We collected geogenic PM10 from four towns in the arid regions of Western Australia. Adult female BALB/c mice were exposed to 100 mg of particles and assessed for inflammatory and lung function responses 6 hours, 24 hours and 7 days post-exposure. We assessed the physico-chemical characteristics of the particles and correlated these with lung outcomes in the mice using principal components analysis and multivariate linear regression. Results: Geogenic particles induced an acute inflammatory response that peaked 6 hours post-exposure and a deficit in lung mechanics 7 days post-exposure. This deficit in lung mechanics was positively associated with the concentration of Fe and particle size variability and inversely associated with the concentration of Si. Conclusions: The lung response to geogenic PM10 is complex and highly dependent on the physico-chemical characteristics of the particles. In particular, the concentration of Fe in the particles may be a key indicator of the potential population health consequences for inhaling geogenic PM10. © 2014 Zosky et al.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e90609
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Particulate Matter
lung function
particulates
Iron
inflammation
lungs
iron
Inflammation
Lung
mice
mechanics
Mechanics
Health
Arid regions
Linear regression
Principal component analysis
Western Australia
Minerals
Dust
dust

Cite this

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title = "The Concentration of Iron in Real-World Geogenic PM10 is Associated with Increased Inflammation and Deficits in Lung Function in Mice",
abstract = "Background: There are many communities around the world that are exposed to high levels of particulate matter ,10 mm (PM10) of geogenic (earth derived) origin. Mineral dusts in the occupational setting are associated with poor lung health, however very little is known about the impact of heterogeneous community derived particles. We have preliminary evidence to suggest that the concentration of iron (Fe) may be associated with the lung inflammatory response to geogenic PM10. We aimed to determine which physico-chemical characteristics of community sampled geogenic PM10 are associated with adverse lung responses. Methods: We collected geogenic PM10 from four towns in the arid regions of Western Australia. Adult female BALB/c mice were exposed to 100 mg of particles and assessed for inflammatory and lung function responses 6 hours, 24 hours and 7 days post-exposure. We assessed the physico-chemical characteristics of the particles and correlated these with lung outcomes in the mice using principal components analysis and multivariate linear regression. Results: Geogenic particles induced an acute inflammatory response that peaked 6 hours post-exposure and a deficit in lung mechanics 7 days post-exposure. This deficit in lung mechanics was positively associated with the concentration of Fe and particle size variability and inversely associated with the concentration of Si. Conclusions: The lung response to geogenic PM10 is complex and highly dependent on the physico-chemical characteristics of the particles. In particular, the concentration of Fe in the particles may be a key indicator of the potential population health consequences for inhaling geogenic PM10. {\circledC} 2014 Zosky et al.",
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The Concentration of Iron in Real-World Geogenic PM10 is Associated with Increased Inflammation and Deficits in Lung Function in Mice. / Zosky, Graeme; Iosifidis, Thomas; Perks, Kara; Ditcham, Will; Devadason, Sunalene; Siah, Shan; Devine, Brian; Maley, Fiona; Cook, Angus.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 2, 2014, p. e90609.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Concentration of Iron in Real-World Geogenic PM10 is Associated with Increased Inflammation and Deficits in Lung Function in Mice

AU - Zosky, Graeme

AU - Iosifidis, Thomas

AU - Perks, Kara

AU - Ditcham, Will

AU - Devadason, Sunalene

AU - Siah, Shan

AU - Devine, Brian

AU - Maley, Fiona

AU - Cook, Angus

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Background: There are many communities around the world that are exposed to high levels of particulate matter ,10 mm (PM10) of geogenic (earth derived) origin. Mineral dusts in the occupational setting are associated with poor lung health, however very little is known about the impact of heterogeneous community derived particles. We have preliminary evidence to suggest that the concentration of iron (Fe) may be associated with the lung inflammatory response to geogenic PM10. We aimed to determine which physico-chemical characteristics of community sampled geogenic PM10 are associated with adverse lung responses. Methods: We collected geogenic PM10 from four towns in the arid regions of Western Australia. Adult female BALB/c mice were exposed to 100 mg of particles and assessed for inflammatory and lung function responses 6 hours, 24 hours and 7 days post-exposure. We assessed the physico-chemical characteristics of the particles and correlated these with lung outcomes in the mice using principal components analysis and multivariate linear regression. Results: Geogenic particles induced an acute inflammatory response that peaked 6 hours post-exposure and a deficit in lung mechanics 7 days post-exposure. This deficit in lung mechanics was positively associated with the concentration of Fe and particle size variability and inversely associated with the concentration of Si. Conclusions: The lung response to geogenic PM10 is complex and highly dependent on the physico-chemical characteristics of the particles. In particular, the concentration of Fe in the particles may be a key indicator of the potential population health consequences for inhaling geogenic PM10. © 2014 Zosky et al.

AB - Background: There are many communities around the world that are exposed to high levels of particulate matter ,10 mm (PM10) of geogenic (earth derived) origin. Mineral dusts in the occupational setting are associated with poor lung health, however very little is known about the impact of heterogeneous community derived particles. We have preliminary evidence to suggest that the concentration of iron (Fe) may be associated with the lung inflammatory response to geogenic PM10. We aimed to determine which physico-chemical characteristics of community sampled geogenic PM10 are associated with adverse lung responses. Methods: We collected geogenic PM10 from four towns in the arid regions of Western Australia. Adult female BALB/c mice were exposed to 100 mg of particles and assessed for inflammatory and lung function responses 6 hours, 24 hours and 7 days post-exposure. We assessed the physico-chemical characteristics of the particles and correlated these with lung outcomes in the mice using principal components analysis and multivariate linear regression. Results: Geogenic particles induced an acute inflammatory response that peaked 6 hours post-exposure and a deficit in lung mechanics 7 days post-exposure. This deficit in lung mechanics was positively associated with the concentration of Fe and particle size variability and inversely associated with the concentration of Si. Conclusions: The lung response to geogenic PM10 is complex and highly dependent on the physico-chemical characteristics of the particles. In particular, the concentration of Fe in the particles may be a key indicator of the potential population health consequences for inhaling geogenic PM10. © 2014 Zosky et al.

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