The causes and consequences of intergroup interactions in mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei)

Melanie Odette Mirville

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Intergroup interactions in primates are highly variable and can range from aggressive to affiliative. An extensive 13 year dataset on intergroup interactions between 14 mountain gorilla groups revealed that interactions were typically aggressive, but were occasionally peaceful. Variation in behaviour during intergroup interactions was due to multiple factors, including intergroup familiarity and relatedness, individual social status and the relative threat of the opponents. Furthermore, agonistic and affiliative interactions between group members were affected by intergroup conflict. This research has important implications for understanding the population dynamics of these endangered apes, and has contributed to our understanding of primate behaviour.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Grueter, Cyril, Supervisor
  • Ridley, Mandy, Supervisor
  • Maloney, Shane, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date14 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2018

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Gorilla beringei
Gorilla gorilla
Primates
mountains
Gorilla
Pongidae
population dynamics

Cite this

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language = "English",
school = "The University of Western Australia",

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The causes and consequences of intergroup interactions in mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei). / Mirville, Melanie Odette.

2018.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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AB - Intergroup interactions in primates are highly variable and can range from aggressive to affiliative. An extensive 13 year dataset on intergroup interactions between 14 mountain gorilla groups revealed that interactions were typically aggressive, but were occasionally peaceful. Variation in behaviour during intergroup interactions was due to multiple factors, including intergroup familiarity and relatedness, individual social status and the relative threat of the opponents. Furthermore, agonistic and affiliative interactions between group members were affected by intergroup conflict. This research has important implications for understanding the population dynamics of these endangered apes, and has contributed to our understanding of primate behaviour.

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KW - intergroup encounter

KW - Familiarity

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KW - collective action problem

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M3 - Doctoral Thesis

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